black birds in Florida

15 dark black birds in Florida

Florida’s diverse ecosystem is home to an array of stunning avian species, each showcasing their unique colors and features. Among these captivating birds are those with dark black plumage, casting an air of mystery and elegance wherever they are found. Amidst the lush landscapes and shimmering waters of Florida, a mysterious allure takes flight the Dark black birds in Florida that grace its skies. Like shadows against the vibrant backdrop, these avian creatures captivate with their sleek plumage and enigmatic presence.

In this article, we will explore 15 dark black birds that inhabit the beautiful state of Florida. From the secretive Black Rail to the iconic Red-winged Blackbird, these avian creatures exhibit both beauty and intrigue, leaving bird enthusiasts and nature lovers in awe.

So, prepare to be enthralled, for we are about to step into a realm where darkness reveals its allure, where the vibrant soul of Florida meets the elegant mystique of its dark black birds in florida.

Here are some additional practices and tips for identifying and spotting dark black birds in Florida.

  1. Observe Habitat Preferences: Dark black birds in Florida often have specific habitat preferences. Look for them in wetlands, marshes, coastal areas, and open fields. Some species may also thrive in urban environments, so keep an eye out for them in parks and residential areas.
  2. Pay Attention to Size and Shape: Dark black birds can vary in size and shape. Notice their overall size compared to other birds nearby. Some species, like the Red-winged Blackbird, are relatively small, while others, such as the Great-tailed Grackle, are larger with a distinctive long tail.
  3. Observe Bill Characteristics: Take note of the shape and length of the bill. Some species, like the Boat-tailed Grackle, have a long, pointed bill, while others, like the Common Grackle, have a stout, thick bill.
  4. Notice Distinctive Features: Look for any unique features or colorations that help differentiate one species from another. For example, the Red-winged Blackbird has bright red and yellow shoulder patches, while the Common Grackle displays iridescent green and blue hues in certain lighting conditions.
  5. Listen to Calls and Songs: Each species has its own vocalizations. Familiarize yourself with the distinct calls and songs of dark black birds in Florida. This can be a helpful clue in identifying them, even when they are not easily visible.
  6. Observe Behaviour: Pay attention to how the birds behave. Some species, like the Black Vulture, are often seen soaring high in the sky, while others, like the Brown-headed Cowbird, may be found foraging on the ground in search of food.
  7. Utilize Field Guides and Mobile Apps: Carry a field guide or use bird identification mobile apps to aid in identifying dark black birds. These resources provide detailed descriptions, range maps, and images that can assist you in confirming the species you have spotted.
  8. Visit Birding Hotspots: Florida boasts several renowned birding hotspots where you are likely to find a variety of bird species, including dark black birds. Locations such as the Everglades National Park, Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, and Corkscrew Swamp Sanctuary offer excellent opportunities for bird-watching.
  9. Practice Patience and Observation: Bird-watching requires patience and keen observation. Take your time and be alert to movement or sounds that may indicate the presence of dark black birds. Scan the surroundings and focus on areas where they are most likely to be found.
  10. Join Birding Groups or Guided Tours: Consider joining local birding groups or participating in guided birding tours in Florida. Experienced birders can share their knowledge and help you spot and identify dark black birds more effectively.

15 astounding dark black birds in Florida:

  1. Black Vulture
  2. Magnificent Frigate bird
  3. Rusty Blackbird
  4. American Crow
  5. Boat-tailed Grackle
  6. Brewer’s Blackbird
  7. Great-tailed grackle
  8. Shiny cowbird
  9. American Coot
  10. Smooth-billed ani
  11. Double-crested Cormorant
  12. Red-winged blackbird
  13. common grackle
  14. Common Gallinule
  15. Anhinga

1. Black vulture:

15 dark black birds in Florida

Scientific name: Coragyps atratus

Size: The Black Vulture, a dark black bird found in Florida, is a medium-sized species. Black Vultures measure between 25 to 27 inches (63 to 69 centimeters) in length from the tip of their beak to the end of their tail. 

How to identify: 

  • All-black plumage: Black vultures are entirely black, with the exception of a few white patches on the underside of their wings.
  • Short tail: Black vultures have a short, square tail.
  • Bare head: The head of a black vulture is bare, with a wrinkled skin that is often black or grey in colour.
  • Long, hooked bill: Black vultures have a long, hooked bill that they use to tear apart their food.
  • Broad wings: Black vultures have broad wings that they use for soaring.

Diet: Black vultures are scavengers, which mean they eat dead animals.

  • Carrion: Black vultures eat carrion, which is the dead body of an animal.
  • Live prey: Black vultures will occasionally eat live prey, but this is not their main source of food. They will eat small mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians, fish, and even insects.
  • Plant matter: Black vultures will occasionally eat plant matter, such as fruit and vegetables. However, this is not a major part of their diet.

Habitat:  Black vultures are found in a wide variety of habitats, including forests, swamps, grasslands, and even urban areas. They are most common in open areas with scattered trees, such as chaparral, as well as subtropical forested areas and parts of the Brazilian pantanal. 

Lifespan: The lifespan of a black vulture in the wild is typically 20 to 25 years. 

Wingspan: The wingspan of a black vulture is typically 1.3 to 1.7 meters (4.3 to 5.6 feet).

Calls: Black vultures are not very vocal birds, but they do make a variety of sounds. These sounds include:

  1. Hissing: Black vultures will often hiss at each other, especially when they are competing for food.
  2. Grunts: Black vultures will also grunt, especially when they are feeding.
  3. Yapping: Courting black vultures may give a yapping sound.
  4. Coos: Nestlings give low hisses or coughs to beg for food, and adults at the nest sometimes give creaky, pigeon like cops.

Seasons: In the northern part of their range, breeding typically begins in February or March, and ends in June or July. In the southern part of their range, breeding can occur year-round, but is most common during the rainy season.

2. Magnificent Frigate bird:

15 dark black birds in Florida

Scientific name: Fregata magnificens

Size: The magnificent frigate bird is the largest species of frigate bird. It measures 89–114 cm (2 ft 11 in – 3 ft 9 in) in length

How to identify: 

  • Body: Magnificent frigate birds are large, black seabirds with long, deeply forked tails. 
  • Head: The head of a magnificent frigate bird is small and has a hooked bill. The male has a bright red gular sac that he inflates during breeding displays. The female has a white throat.
  • Wings: The wings of a magnificent frigate bird are long and pointed. They are used for soaring and for catching fish.
  • Tail: The tail of a magnificent frigate bird is long and deeply forked. It is used for steering and for balancing during flight.

Diet:  Magnificent frigate birds are carnivores and feed on fish, squid, and other marine animals. They are also kleptoparasites, which means they steal food from other birds.

Habitat: Magnificent frigate birds are found in tropical and subtropical waters of the Americas. They are most common near islands and reefs, where they can find food and nesting sites. 

Lifespan: The magnificent frigate bird has an average lifespan of 14 to 24 years.

Wingspan: The magnificent frigate bird has a wingspan of 7 to 8 feet (2.1 to 2.4 meters).

Calls: 

  • Grating call: This call is made when the bird is coming in for a landing or when it is fighting with another bird.
  • Courtship drumming: The male makes this call during courtship. It is a series of loud, guttural sounds that are made by drumming the bill on the gular sac.
  • Begging calls: The young birds make these calls when they are begging for food. They are harsh, screeching sounds.

Season: Magnificent frigate birds breed during the wet season, which typically runs from December to April. 

3. Rusty Blackbird: 

15 dark black birds in Florida

Rusty blackbirds are an important part of the wetland ecosystem. They help to control insect populations and disperse seeds. However, the rusty blackbird population has declined by over 90% in the past 40 years. This decline is due to a number of factors, including habitat loss, climate change, and pesticide use.

Scientific name: Euphagus carolinus.

Size: The rusty blackbird is a medium-sized bird, measuring 8.5–9.8 in (220–250 mm) in length. 

How to identify: 

Male rusty blackbird: The male rusty blackbird is glossy black with rusty brown edges on his feathers. He has a thin, deserved bill and a long tail.

Female rusty blackbird: The female rusty blackbird is brown with rusty brown streaks on her head, neck, and breast. She has a thin, decurved bill and a medium-length tail.

Diet: Rusty blackbirds are omnivorous birds that eat a variety of insects, seeds, and berries. They are especially fond of aquatic insects, such as caddisflies, mayflies, and dragonflies. They also eat land insects, such as grasshoppers, beetles, and caterpillars. In the winter, they eat a variety of seeds, including acorns, pine nuts, and berries.

Habitat: Rusty blackbirds are found in a variety of wetland habitats, including swamps, marshes, bogs, and beaver ponds. They are also found in some upland areas, such as old fields and forest edges. Rusty blackbirds prefer areas with dense vegetation, such as cattails, reeds, and shrubs. 

Lifespan: The average lifespan of a rusty blackbird in the wild is 4-5 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a rusty blackbird is 14 inches (36 cm).

Calls: The call of the rusty blackbird is a sharp “check.” The alarm call of the rusty blackbird is a loud “scream.”

Season: During the breeding season, this typically occurs from May to July.  

4. American Crow:

Scientific name: Corvus brachyrhynchos. 

Size: American crows are about 40–53 cm (16–21 in) long, from beak to tail.

How to identify: American crows are large, all-black birds with a heavy, straight bill. They have a long tail and their legs and feet are also black

Diet: American crows are omnivores and eat a wide variety of foods, including insects, small mammals, eggs, fruit, and carrion. They are also known to scavenge food from garbage dumps and other human-altered habitats.

Habitat: American crows are found throughout North America, from Alaska to Newfoundland and from the Pacific coast to the Great Plains. They are most common in open habitats, such as fields, farms, and woodlands.

Lifespan: The average lifespan of an American crow in the wild is 7–8 years. 

Wingspan: The wingspan of an American crow is 33 to 39 inches. 

Calls:

  • Caw: This is the most common call of American crows. It is a loud, harsh call that can be heard for long distances. Crows use this call to communicate with each other about food, danger, and other important information.
  • Rake: This is a high-pitched, raspy call that is often used by crows to warn each other of danger.
  • Gobble: This is a low-pitched, guttural call that is often used by crows to communicate with each other during breeding season.
  • Chitter: This is a soft, high-pitched call that is often used by crows to communicate with each other at close range.

Season: The breeding season for American crows typically begins in late winter or early spring, and lasts until late summer or early fall.

5. Boat-tailed Grackle:

Scientific name: Quiscalus major

Size: The size of a boat-tailed grackle bird in Florida can vary depending on the sex of the bird. Males are typically larger than females, measuring 37-43 cm (15-17 in) in length. Females are much smaller, measuring 26-33 cm (10-13 in) in length. 

How to identify: Boat-tailed grackles are large, black birds with a long, keel-shaped tail. Males are glossy black with a purple sheen, while females are brown with a black head and tail. Both sexes have a long, pointed bill and yellow eyes.

Diet:  Boat-tailed grackles are omnivores and eat a variety of foods, including:

  • Insects: Boat-tailed eat a wide variety of insects, including grasshoppers, beetles, flies, and caterpillars.
  • Seeds: Boat-tailed grackles will also eat a variety of seeds, including corn, millet, and sorghum.
  • Fruit: Boat-tailed grackles will also eat a variety of fruit, including berries, grapes, and apples.
  • Small mammals: Boat-tailed grackles will also eat small mammals, such as mice and rats.
  • Scavenged food: Boat-tailed grackles will also scavenge for food. 

Habitat:

  • Coastal areas: Boat-tailed grackles are most common in coastal areas of Florida, where they can be found in marshes, swamps, and along beaches.
  • Inland areas: Boat-tailed grackles can also be found in inland areas of Florida, such as parks, golf courses, and even backyards.

Lifespan: The average lifespan of a boat-tailed grackle in Florida is 10-12 years, but some individuals have been known to live for up to 20 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a boat-tailed grackle in Florida is typically 39-50 cm (15-20 in).

Calls: Boat-tailed grackles are noisy birds and their calls can be heard for long distances. They are known for their loud, clear whistle, while the female’s call is a sharp, harsh chatter.

Season: The breeding season for boat-tailed grackles in Florida is from February to September. During this time, males will establish territories and will attract mates by displaying their bright black plumage and by making loud, clear whistles. Females will build nests in trees or shrubs near water, and will lay 3-6 eggs. The young birds will fledge after about 18 days.

6. Brewer’s Blackbird

Scientific name: Euphagus cyanocephalus.

Size: Brewer’s Blackbirds are about 8-10 inches long.

How to identify: Males are glossy black with an iridescent purple head and neck, while females are brownish-gray.

Diet: In the winter, they eat mostly insects, such as grasshoppers, crickets, beetles, and caterpillars. They also eat seeds and berries. In the summer, they eat more insects and less seeds and berries.

Habitant: They are found in open areas, such as fields, prairies, and parks. They also frequent golf courses, sewage treatment plants, and other areas where there is an abundance of food and water.

Lifespan: The average lifespan of a Brewer’s Blackbird in Florida is 12 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a Brewer’s blackbird in Florida is typically 14.6 inches (37 cm).

Calls: 

  • A sharp “tchup” or “chuk” call, which is used for communication between birds.
  • A clear, descending whistle, about 0.5 second long, when they sight hawks or large birds.
  • A kit-tit-tit-tit call, used by females when quarreling.
  • A shrill, rising squeeze that lasts about 0.8 second, with a metallic sound.
  • A non-musical rushing gurgle, also lasting less than a second.

Season: Brewer’s blackbirds begin to arrive in Florida in November. They are attracted to the state’s warm weather and abundant food sources. Brewer’s blackbirds are most common in Florida during December. They can be seen in large flocks, often numbering in the hundreds or even thousands. January: Brewer’s blackbird numbers begin to decline in January. Some birds begin to migrate back to their breeding grounds, while others remain in Florida for the winter. February: Brewer’s blackbirds are a rare sight in Florida by February. Most birds have migrated back to their breeding grounds, but a few stragglers may remain.

7. Great-tailed grackle

Scientific name: Quiscalus Mexican 

Size: The size of a great-tailed grackle blackbird in Florida is typically 18-22 inches long.

How to identify: The male great-tailed grackle is glossy black with a purple-green sheen. It has a long, slender bill and a long, forked tail the female great-tailed grackle is brown with a black head and tail. It has a shorter, thicker bill and a shorter, rounded tail. Juvenile great-tailed grackles are brown with black streaks. They have a shorter, thicker bill and a shorter, rounded tail than adults.

Diet: Great-tailed grackles are very adaptable birds, and their diet can vary depending on the season and the availability of food. In the summer, when insects are plentiful, grackles will eat mostly insects. In the winter, when insects are scarce, grackles will switch to a diet of seeds and fruit.

Habitat: Open fields: Grackles are often seen foraging in open fields, where they search for insects and seeds. Wetlands: Grackles are also found in wetlands, where they eat insects, fish, and frogs. Urban areas: Grackles are increasingly common in urban areas, where they find food in parks, gardens, and even on garbage cans.

Lifespan: The average lifespan of a great-tailed grackle in Florida is 10-12 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a great-tailed grackle in Florida is typically 26-30 inches. Males are slightly larger than females, and their wingspans can be up to 32 inches.

Calls: Great-tailed grackles are noisy birds and their calls can be heard throughout the year. They make a variety of sounds, including: Alarm calls: When alarmed, great-tailed grackles will make a loud, harsh “chack” or “chat” call. Solicitation calls: When ready to mate, both sexes will make a soft “chep” or “cheat” call. Territorial calls: Males will make a loud, rattling “kree-ah” call to defend their territory.

Season: They are most common during the breeding season, which is from March to August. During this time, they will build nests and raise their young. After the breeding season, they will form large flocks and forage for food together.

8. Shiny cowbird:

Scientific name: Molothrus bonariensis

Size: The shiny cowbird blackbird is a medium-sized bird, measuring about 7.1 inches (18 cm) in length.

How to identify: The male shiny cowbird is glossy black with a purple sheen. The female is brown with white streaks on her belly. Both sexes have a long, thin bill and a short tail.

Diet: The diet of shiny cowbirds in Florida consists mainly of insects, other arthropods, and seeds.

Habitat: Shiny cowbirds are found in open habitats, such as fields, pastures, and roadsides. They are also found in urban areas, where they can be seen in parks and gardens. Shiny cowbirds are not found in dense forests or other areas with heavy vegetation.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a shiny cowbird in Florida is typically 2-3 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a shiny cowbird in Florida is typically 14-16 inches (36-41 cm). 

Calls:

  • A rapid rattle: This is a common call that is used to communicate with other cowbirds.
  • A high, wavering whistle: This call is used to attract mates.
  • A low chuk: This call is used to defend territory.

Season: The breeding season of the shiny cowbird in Florida is from April to August.

9. American Coot

Scientific name: Fulica Americana

Size: The American coot blackbird in Florida is about 15 inches in length. 

How to identify: American coots are black birds with white bills and red eyes. They have long, thin toes and lobed feet. 

Diet: American coots are omnivorous and their diet consists of a variety of plants, insects, and small animals.

Habitat: American coots are found in a variety of habitats in Florida, including freshwater lakes, ponds, marshes, and rivers.

Lifespan: The average lifespan of an American coot blackbird in Florida is about 10 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of an American coot blackbird in Florida is typically 28 inches.

Calls: A loud, guttural “graw-graw” call that is used for communication and alarm. 

Season: they are most abundant during the breeding season, which is from March to August. 

10. Smooth-billed ani

Scientific name: Crotophaga ani

Size: The smooth-billed ani is a mid-sized bird, measuring approximately 35 cm (14 in) in overall length.

How to identify: The smooth-billed ani is a glossy black bird with a long tail and a large, curved beak. It has a brown iris and a yellow cere.

Diet: The smooth-billed ani is an omnivore, and its diet consists of a variety of insects, fruit, and small vertebrates. They will also eat small vertebrates, such as lizards, frogs, and snakes.

Habitat: Smooth-billed anis is found in tropical and subtropical regions of the Americas, from southern Florida to southern Chile.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a smooth-billed ani blackbird in Florida is typically around 10 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a smooth-billed ani blackbird in Florida is typically around 18 inches.

Calls: A low, guttural “whup” call, which is used as a warning call. A high-pitched “peep” call, which is used by young birds to beg for food. 

Season: They are most common during the breeding season, which is from March to September.

11. Double-crested Cormorant

Scientific name: Nannopterum auritum

Size: Double-crested cormorants are about 28 inches long.

How to identify: Double-crested cormorants are large, black birds with a long, S-shaped neck and a hooked bill. They have yellow-orange skin around their eyes and on their throat.

Diet: Double-crested cormorants are fish-eating birds that are found in both fresh and saltwater habitats.

Habitat: Double-crested cormorants are found in a variety of habitats in Florida, including: Coastal areas, including beaches, bays, and estuaries.

Life span: The lifespan of a double-crested cormorant in Florida is typically 15-20 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a double-crested cormorant in Florida is typically between 44.9 and 48.4 inches (114 and 123 cm).

  • Calls: Groans: These are low, guttural sounds that are made by both adults and juveniles. Quack-like calls: These are short, sharp sounds that are made by adults during breeding season. 
  • Grating calls: These are long, harsh sounds that are made by adults during breeding season. They are thought to be used to defend their territory.
  • Screams: These are loud, piercing sounds that are made by adults in distress. They are often used when a bird is being attacked or when it is trying to scare off a predator.

Season: they are most active during the breeding season, which is from April to August. During this time, they will build nests and lay eggs.

12. Red-winged blackbird

Scientific name: Agelaius phoeniceus.

Size: The size of a red-winged blackbird in Florida is about 7-9 inches long.

How to identify: The male red-winged blackbird is black with bright red shoulder patches. The female is brown with black streaks. Both sexes have a yellow beak and eyes.

Diet: Red-winged blackbirds are omnivores and their diet consists of a variety of insects, seeds, and berries. 

Habitant: Red-winged blackbirds are found in a variety of habitats in Florida, including: Marshes, Wetlands, Fields, Farmlands, Backyards etc. 

Lifespan: The average lifespan of a red-winged blackbird in Florida is 2.14 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a red-winged blackbird in Florida is typically between 12 and 16 inches.

Calls:  The female red-winged blackbird’s call is a short, sharp “check.” This call is used to communicate with her mate and young. Both male and female red-winged blackbirds make a loud, harsh “chak-chak-chak” alarm call when they are threatened.

Season: their breeding season is typically from March to July.

13. common grackle

Scientific name: Quiscalus quiscula floridanus

Size: The nominate subspecies has an average length of 11-13 inches. The Florida subspecies is slightly larger, with an average length of 12-14 inches.

How to identify: Common grackles are large, blackbirds with long tails. They have a glossy green sheen on their backs, and a bright yellow eye. Females are a duller black, and do not have the glossy green sheen.

Diet: Common grackles are omnivorous and eat a wide variety of foods, including: Grackles eat a variety of insects, including beetles, grasshoppers, caterpillars, and ants. Seeds: Grackles also eat a variety of seeds, including corn, rice, and sunflower seeds. Fruit: Grackles will also eat fruit, such as berries, grapes, and apples. They often eat fruit that has fallen from trees, but they will also eat fruit that is still on the tree.

Habitant: Common grackles are found in a variety of habitats in Florida, including: Open fields, Marshes, Urban areas, Forest edges, Wetlands, Golf courses, Airports, Sewage treatment plants. 

Lifespan: The lifespan of a common grackle blackbird in Florida is typically 10-12 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a common grackle blackbird in Florida is typically 14-18 inches.

Calls: 

  • Alarm call: A harsh, rasping chaa or chitip call is given when alarmed, taking flight, or approaching other grackles.
  • Contact call: A soft, warbling call is given to keep in touch with other grackles.
  • Begging call: A high-pitched, whining call is given by young grackles when begging for food.

Season: they are most abundant during the breeding season, which is from March to August. 

14. Common Gallinule: 

Scientific name: Gallinula galeata

Size: They measure 12.6–13.8 inches (32–35 cm) in length.

How to identify: The adult common gallinule is a stocky bird with a short neck and legs, and a large, red frontal shield. The plumage is dark overall, with a white undertail and yellow legs. The immature common gallinule is similar in appearance to the adult, but the red frontal shield is smaller and the plumage is more mottled.

Diet: 

  • Plants: Seeds, leaves, stems, and fruits of aquatic plants, such as water lilies, cattails, and bulrushes.
  • Insects: Insects such as dragonflies, damselflies, mosquitoes, and caddisflies.
  • Small animals: Small fish, frogs, snails, and crayfish.

Habitant: Common gallinules are found in freshwater wetlands throughout Florida. They are most commonly seen in lakes, rivers, and marshes.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a common gallinule in Florida is typically 5-7 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a common gallinule in Florida is typically 21.3-24.4 inches (54-62 cm).

Calls:        

  • Cackle: A loud, harsh cackle that is often used as a contact call. 
  • Whinny: A high-pitched whinny that is often used as a warning call.
  • Squawk: A sharp squawk that is often used as a distress call.
  • Galloping sound: A galloping sound that is made when the bird runs    across the surface of the water.

Season: the peak breeding season is from late winter to early summer.

15. Anhinga: 

Scientific name: Anhinga anhinga

Size: The anhinga blackbird in Florida is a large bird, measuring approximately 89 cm (35 in) in length (with a range of 75–95 cm (30–37 in). 

How to identify: Adult anhinga is glossy black with white wing patches. They have a long, snake-like neck and a sharp bill. Juvenile anhinga is browner than adults and has shorter tails.

Diet: Anhinga is carnivores and their diet consists mainly of fish, frogs, and other small aquatic animals.

Habitant: They are most commonly seen in lakes, rivers, and wetlands.

Lifespan: The average lifespan of anhinga in Florida is 10-15 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of anhinga in Florida is typically around 3.7 feet (1.14 meters).

Calls: anhingas are generally silent except when they are near the nest. Males and females make a loud clicking sound during nest exchanges that sounds a little like a ratchet.

Season: Anhingas are a year-round resident of Florida, but they are most active during the breeding season, which is from February to June.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Florida’s unique geographic position and climatic conditions make it a hospitable place for a variety of avian species, including several predominantly black birds. From aquatic species such as the Anhinga and the Double-crested Cormorant to urban dwellers like the American Crow and the Common Starling, Florida is a birder’s paradise. Other species like the Rusty Blackbird and Brewer’s Blackbird visit Florida during the winter. Regardless of the season, you’re likely to encounter at least a few of these 15 predominantly dark black birds in Florida, each contributing to the diverse tapestry of the state’s avian life.

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