blue birds in Florida

21 astounding beautiful blue birds in Florida

Welcome to the enchanting world of Florida’s vibrant avian residents! Nestled amidst the lush greenery and sparkling waters, the Sunshine State is home to a plethora of stunning bird species. Among them, the 21 beautiful blue birds of Florida stand out as true gems of the skies. Their iridescent feathers, ranging from deep sapphire to dazzling turquoise, captivate the imagination and evoke a sense of awe in anyone fortunate enough to witness their graceful flight.

Join us as we embark on a journey to discover these mesmerizing creatures, uncovering their unique characteristics, habitats, and the fascinating stories they bring to the azure horizons of Florida. Prepare to be enchanted by the kaleidoscope of blue hues that grace the heavens and leave a lasting imprint on your heart.

Here are some tips and practices for observing these beautiful blue birds:

  • Go bird watching during the spring and fall: These are the best times of year to see blue birds in Florida, as they are migrating to and from their breeding grounds.
  • Look for blue birds in open areas: Blue birds are cavity nesters, so they often build their nests in dead trees or birdhouses. They can also be found in open areas such as fields, meadows, and parks.
  • Use binoculars or a spotting scope: This will help you get a closer look at the birds and identify them.
  • Be patient: Blue birds can be shy, so it may take some time to get a good look at them.

Best 21 astounding beautiful blue birds in Florida: 

  1. Indigo bunting
  2. Tree swallow
  3. Purple martin
  4. Eastern bluebird
  5. Common grackle
  6. Great blue heron
  7. Common gallinule
  8. Cerulean warbler
  9. Northern parula
  10. Little blue heron
  11. Painted bunting
  12. Blue grosbeak
  13. Aphelocoma
  14. Florida scrub Jay
  15. Bluebirds
  16. Black-throated blue warbler
  17. Blue-headed vireo
  18. Belted kingfisher
  19. Blue-winged teal
  20. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher 
  21. Blue Jay

Let’s jump into the pool of their diet, habitat, calls, season, appearances etc.  

1. Indigo bunting

Indigo bunting

Scientific name: Passerina cyanea

Size: The average length of an adult male indigo bunting is 4.5–5.9 inches (11.5–15 cm). The adult female is slightly smaller than the adult male, with an average length of 4.3–5.5 inches (11–14 cm).

Appearances: The male indigo bunting is a beautiful blue all over, with a slightly richer blue on his head and a shiny, silver-gray bill. The female indigo bunting is brown on the upper parts and lighter brown on the under parts. She has a white throat and a dark brown eye stripe. She is not as brightly colored as the male, but she is still a beautiful bird.  Juvenile indigo buntings are brown all over with a few blue feathers on their head.

Diet: Indigo buntings are insectivores, and their diet consists of insects, spiders, and seeds.

Habitat: Indigo buntings are found in a variety of habitats, including open woodlands, fields, and marshes. They are most common in areas with dense shrubbery and abundant food sources.

Lifespan: Indigo buntings typically live for 4-6 years in Florida. The oldest recorded indigo bunting was 13 years old.

Wingspan: The wingspan of an indigo bunting in Florida is typically 18-23 centimetres (7.1-9.1 inches).

Calls: Here are some of the calls of the indigo bunting:

  • Song: The male’s song is a series of clear, high-pitched notes that are repeated over and over again. It is often described as a warble or a buzz. The song is used to attract mates and defend territory. [Sound of Indigo Bunting song]
  • Chip: The female’s call is a sharp chip! That is used to warn of danger. It is also used to communicate with her young. [Sound of Indigo Bunting chip call]
  • Mew: The male and female may also make a mew call, which is a soft, low-pitched sound. This call is used to communicate with each other and with their young. [Sound of Indigo Bunting mew call]

Seasons: Indigo buntings are migratory birds, and they spend the winter in South America. They typically arrive in Florida in the spring, around April, and depart in the fall, around October.

2. Tree swallow

Tree swallow

Scientific name: Tachycineta bicolor

Size: Tree swallows are typically about 5-6 inches long.

Appearances: Tree swallows are small, blue birds with white bellies and black heads. They have long, pointed wings and a forked tail.

Diet : Tree swallows are insectivores, meaning they eat insects. 

Habitat: They can be found in a variety of habitats, including: Open areas, such as fields, meadows, marshes and Wooded areas, such as forests and parks.In Residential areas, if there are plenty of trees and shrubs for nesting and food sources. 

Lifespan: Tree swallows typically live for 3-5 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a tree swallow in Florida is typically 11.8-13.8 inches.

Calls: Tree swallows make a high-pitched, twittering call that is often repeated. They also make a sharp, metallic “churring” call when they are alarmed.

Seasons: Tree swallows typically arrive in Florida in March and leave in October.

3. Purple martin

Purple martin

Scientific name: Progne subis

Size: Purple martins are the largest swallows in North America, with an average length of 7.5-7.9 inches (19-20 cm).

Appearances: The purple martin is a large swallow with iridescent blue and purple feathers. It has a long, forked tail.

Diet : Purple martins eat a variety of insects, including mosquitoes, dragonflies, wasps, and beetles. They catch insects in flight, often soaring high in the air or hovering near water. Purple martins are very good at catching insects, and they can eat up to 2,000 insects per day.

Habitat: They prefer open areas near water, such as fields, meadows, and marshes. They also frequent backyards and parks, where they can find food and nesting sites. Purple martins are cavity nesters, and they will often use man-made nest boxes.

Lifespan: The lifespan of purple martins in Florida is typically around 4-5 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a purple martin is typically 15-16 inches.

Calls: Purple martins make a series of high-pitched whistles that sound like “pee-wee” or “pew-pew.” They also make a low-pitched churring sound that is used to communicate with their mates and young.

Seasons: 

  • Spring: Purple martins arrive in Florida in late March or early April. They are attracted to the state’s warm weather and abundance of insects.
  • Summer: Purple martins breed in Florida from April to August. They typically lay 4-6 eggs per clutch, and the young birds fledge after about 18 days.
  • Fall: Purple martins leave Florida in late August or early September. They fly south to South America for the winter.

4. Eastern bluebird

Eastern bluebird

Scientific name: Sialia sialis

Size: The size of an eastern bluebird in Florida is about 6-8 inches long.

Appearances: The male eastern bluebird is bright blue on the head, back, and wings, with a rusty-orange breast and belly. The female eastern bluebird is a duller blue with a grayish breast and belly. Juvenile eastern bluebirds are brown with white spots. They will gradually develop the adult plumage as they mature.

Diet: Eastern bluebirds in Florida are insectivores, meaning they eat primarily insects. They will eat a variety of insects, including beetles, grasshoppers, wasps, and flies. They will also eat spiders, earthworms, and snails. In the winter, they will also eat berries and fruit.

Lifespan: The lifespan of an eastern bluebird in Florida is typically 6 to 10 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of an eastern bluebird in Florida is typically 9 to 12 inches.

Calls: The eastern bluebird also has a contact call that is used to keep in touch with other birds. The contact call is a soft, high-pitched “tu-a-wee.” The eastern bluebird also has an alarm call that is used to warn other birds of danger. The alarm call is a loud, sharp “peep.”

Seasons: Eastern bluebirds arrive in Florida in late March or early April. They begin breeding in late March or early April. Eastern bluebirds are most common in Florida during the summer. They raise their young during this time. Eastern bluebirds begin to migrate south in late August or early September. They will typically winter in the southeastern United States, Mexico, and Central America. Eastern bluebirds are not as common in Florida during the winter. They will typically winter in the southeastern United States, Mexico, and Central America.

5. Common grackle

Common grackle

Scientific name: Quiscalus quiscula

Size: The size of a common grackle in Florida is about 12.5 inches long.

Appearances: Common grackles are often seen in urban areas, where they can be found foraging for food in parks, parking lots, and other open spaces. Common grackles are also common in parks, where they can be seen feeding on insects, seeds, and fruit. Common grackles are often seen in fields, where they can be seen foraging for insects and seeds. Common grackles are also attracted to water bodies, where they can be seen feeding on insects and fish.

Diet: Common grackles and bluebirds are both omnivores, but their diets vary slightly. Common grackles are more opportunistic feeders and will eat a wider variety of foods, including insects, seeds, fruit, and even small vertebrates.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a common grackle in Florida is typically 5-7 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a common grackle in Florida is typically 14-18 inches.

Calls: The most common call of the common grackle is a loud, raucous cackle. This call is used for a variety of purposes, including tocommunicate with other grackles, to defend their territory, and to attract mates. Grackles also make a gurgling sound, which is often used as a contact call between mates. Grackles also make a gurgling sound, which is often used as a contact call between mates. Grackles will also make a sharp squawk sound, which is often used as a warning call.

Seasons:  March-August

6. Great blue heron

Great blue heron

Scientific name: Ardea Herodias 

Size: Length: 38.2-53.9 inches (97-137 cm)

Appearances: The great blue heron is a large, blue-gray bird with a long neck and legs.

Diet: The great blue heron is an opportunistic feeder, and its diet varies depending on the season and location. However, it typically eats fish, frogs, snakes, turtles, small mammals, and insects.

Lifespan: Great blue herons can live for up to 20 years.

Wingspan: 65.8-79.1 inches (167-201 cm)

Calls : The great blue heron has a deep, guttural call that is often described as a “croak.” This call is used for a variety of purposes, including to attract mates, to defend territory, and to warn of danger.

Seasons: Great blue herons typically breed in the spring and summer, from March to August.

7. Common gallinule

Common gallinule

Scientific name: Gallinula chloropus

Size: The common gallinule is about 18 inches long and weighs about 12 ounces.

Appearances: The common gallinule is a medium-sized marsh bird that is bluish gray to charcoal gray in color, with a bright red forehead shield and green legs.

Diet: These birds are omnivores and eat a variety of plant and animal matter. Their diet includes seeds, fruits, insects, snails, frogs, and small fish. They will also eat carrion if they find it.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a common gallinule in Florida is typically 5-7 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a common gallinule in Florida is typically 20-24 inches.

Calls: Common gallinules will often make a loud, sharp cry when they see a predator. Common gallinules will often make a soft, low-pitched “gobble” call. 

Seasons: Common gallinules breed in Florida from March to September. They build their nests in floating vegetation in marshes and ponds. The female lays 3-7 eggs, which hatch after about 2 weeks.

8. Cerulean warbler

Cerulean warbler

Scientific name: Setophaga cerulean

Size: The cerulean warbler is a small songbird that is about 4.3 inches long.

Appearances: The cerulean warbler is a small, blue bird with a black necklace and white wingbars. 

Diet: Cerulean warblers typically eat flying insects, such as flies, beetles, and moths.

Lifespan: The lifespan of cerulean warblers in Florida is about 4-5 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a cerulean warbler in Florida is 7.9 inches.

Calls: The cerulean warbler has a high-pitched, descending warble that is repeated several times.

Seasons

Arrives in Florida: March-April

  • Breeds: April-June
  • Leaves Florida: August-September

9. Northern parula

Northern parula

Scientific name: Setophaga Americana

Size: The northern parula bluebird is a small songbird that is about 4.5 inches long.

Appearances: The male northern parula bluebird is blue on the back and head, with a white throat and breast. He has a black mask around his eyes and a white eyering. The female northern parula bluebird is green on the back and head, with a yellow throat and breast. She has a black mask around her eyes and a white eyering. Juvenile northern parula bluebirds are similar in appearance to the female, but they have brown streaks on their back and wings.

Diet: The northern parula bluebird is an insectivore, meaning that it eats insects. They also eat spiders, berries, and nectar.

Lifespan: The average lifespan of a northern parula bluebird in Florida is 3-4 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a northern parula bluebird in Florida is typically around 5.5 inches.

Calls: The northern parula bluebird has a variety of calls, including a warbled song, a chipping call, and a scolding call.

Seasons: Northern parula bluebirds are migratory birds, which means they travel long distances between their breeding and wintering grounds. In Florida, northern parula bluebirds breed during the spring and summer, and they winter in the southeastern United States and the Caribbean.

10. Little blue heron

Little blue heron

Scientific name: Egretta caerulea

Size: 18-22 inches long.

Appearances: Little blue herons are small, slender herons with long necks and legs. Adult little blue herons are blue-gray in color, with black legs and a yellow bill. Juveniles are brown with white stripes on their backs.

Diet: Little blue herons are carnivores and their diet consists mainly of fish, frogs, and insects. They will also eat small mammals, reptiles, and birds.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a little blue heron in Florida is typically 10-12 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a little blue heron in Florida is typically 36-40 inches.

Calls: Little blue herons are typically silent, but they can utter hoarse, harsh squawks and croaks. They also clack their bills to communicate.

Seasons: Little blue herons breed in Florida from March to September.

11. Painted bunting

Painted Bunting

Scientific name: Passerina ciris

Size: 11.5–13 cm (4.5–5.1 in) in length and 12–18 g (0.42–0.63 oz) in weight.

Appearances: The male painted bunting is a brightly colored bird with iridescent blue feathers on its head, back, and wings. It has a black head and throat, a white belly, and a red rump. The female painted bunting is green with brown streaks.

Diet: The painted bunting’s diet consists mainly of insects, spiders, and berries. It will also eat some seeds, especially in the winter.

Lifespan: The lifespan of painted buntings and bluebirds in Florida is typically about 3-5 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a painted bunting in Florida is typically 21-23 cm (8.3-9.1 in).

Calls: The male painted bunting has a loud, clear, and variable song consisting of a series of high-pitched musical notes. The call is a sharp, metallic tsick.

Seasons: The painted bunting breeds in the southeastern United States during the spring and summer. In Florida, they can be seen from April to September. They migrate to Central and South America in the winter.

12. Blue grosbeak

Blue grosbeak

Scientific name: Passerina caerulea

Size: 5.9-6.3 inches (15-16 cm) in length.

Appearances: The male blue grosbeak is a beautiful bird with bright blue plumage. It has a black mask and white wingbars. The female blue grosbeak is brown with a white throat and breast.

Diet: 

Insects: Insects make up the majority of the blue grosbeak’s diet in the summer. They eat a variety of insects, including beetles, grasshoppers, crickets, and caterpillars.

  • Seeds: Blue grosbeaks also eat seeds in the winter. They eat a variety of seeds, including sunflower seeds, millet, and corn.
  • Berries: Blue grosbeaks will also eat berries in the summer. They eat a variety of berries, including mulberries, blackberries, and blueberries.

Lifespan: The lifespan of blue grosbeaks in Florida is typically 3-5 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a blue grosbeak in Florida is typically 11-12 inches.

Calls: The male blue grosbeak has a sweet, jumbled warble that is often described as sounding like a flute. The female blue grosbeak has a more subdued call that is similar to a sparrow’s chirp.

Seasons: Blue grosbeaks and bluebirds are both migratory birds in Florida. They arrive in the spring, typically in March or April, and leave in the fall, typically in October or November.

13. Aphelocoma

Aphelocoma

The Aphelocoma blue bird, also known as the Florida Scrub-Jay, is a unique and captivating species that graces the landscapes of Florida. With its vibrant blue plumage and charismatic personality, this bird has become an emblematic symbol of the state’s diverse ecosystems.

Scientific name: Aphelocoma coerulescens

Size: average length of about 11 to 12 inches (28 to 30 centimeters).

Appearance: The bird’s face showcases unique markings. It has a white throat and a narrow white stripe above the eyes, extending back towards the nape. The forehead and crown of the head are a pale grayish-blue color.

Diet: The diet of the Aphelocoma blue bird is adapted to its specific scrub habitat, where it relies on a mix of insect prey, seeds, nuts, and fruits.

Lifespan: The lifespan of the Aphelocoma blue bird, or Florida Scrub-Jay, can vary, but on average, they live for about 7 to 10 years in the wild.

Wingspan: The wingspan of the Aphelocoma blue bird, or Florida Scrub-Jay, typically ranges from 13 to 15 inches (33 to 38 centimeters).

Calls:

  • Cheer-Up” Call: One of the most recognizable calls of the Aphelocoma blue bird is a loud and clear “Cheer-up” call. It is a series of distinct notes, with the first note being higher in pitch and the following notes descending in tone. This call is often used as a contact call within family groups or to maintain group cohesion.
  • “Rattle” Call: The “Rattle” call is a harsh and rapid series of chattering or rattling notes. This call is typically used during aggressive interactions or when the bird perceives a potential threat to its territory or nesting site.
  • “Whisper” Call: The “Whisper” call is a soft and low-toned vocalization that is used during close-range communication within a family group or when the bird is near its nest. It is a softer version of the typical “Cheer-up” call.
  • Squeaky Gate” Call: The “Squeaky Gate” call is a distinctive, high-pitched vocalization that resembles the sound of a rusty gate swinging open and closed. This call is often associated with alarm or agitation and is used to alert other group members of potential danger or disturbances.
  • Mimicry: Aphelocoma blue birds have been observed to mimic the calls of other bird species or imitate sounds from their environment. This mimicry behavior is thought to be a way to confuse or deceive potential predators or intruders.

Seasons: The breeding season for the Aphelocoma blue bird in Florida typically begins in late winter or early spring, around February or March, and extends into early summer.

14. Black-throated blue warbler

Black-throated blue warbler

Scientific name: Setophaga caerulescens

Size: It measures 9-10 inches in length.

Appearances: It has a bright blue head, back, and wings, with a white breast and a rusty-orange belly. The female is a duller blue with a white breast. 

Diet: Black-throated blue warblers are insectivores, meaning they eat insects. They catch insects by flying through the air or by gleaning them from leaves and branches. They also eat berries and seeds.

Lifespan: The average lifespan for both species is about 4 years.

Wingspan: 6-7 inches

Calls: The black-throated blue warbler has a very distinctive call, which is a series of high-pitched, descending notes that sound like “sweet, sweet, sweet.”

Seasons: The bluebird is also a migratory bird, but it breeds in a wider range than the black-throated blue warbler. Bluebirds breed in North America, from southern Canada to Mexico, and then migrate to the southern United States and Mexico for the winter.

15. Blue-headed vireo

Blue-headed vireo

Scientific name: Vireo solitaries

Size: The blue-headed vireo is a small bird, measuring about 5 inches in length.

Appearances: blue-headed vireos are small birds with a greenish-yellow body and a bright blue head and throat. They have a long, thin bill and dark eyes. Blue-headed vireos are often seen flitting through the trees, singing their high-pitched songs.

Diet: Blue-headed vireos are insectivores, meaning they eat insects. Their diet consists mainly of caterpillars, beetles, wasps, bees, ants, moths, tree crickets, and many others; they also eat spiders. In the winter, they may eat some berries and small fruits.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a blue-headed vireo in Florida is typically 4-5 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a blue-headed vireo in Florida is typically 6-7 inches.

Calls: Here is a description of some of the calls of blue-headed vireos:

  • Chip: A sharp, single note that is often used as a contact call between birds.
  • Seep: A descending, two-note call that is often used as an alarm call.
  • Song: A series of high-pitched whistles and trills that is often repeated over and over again.

Seasons: they are most common during the breeding season, which is from April to August.

16. Belted kingfisher

Belted kingfisher

Scientific name: Megaceryle alcyon

Size: The belted kingfisher is a medium-sized bird, measuring 17-20 inches in length

Appearance: The head is large and round, with a long, pointed bill. The bill is blue-gray in color. The body is stocky and blue-gray in color. The wings and tail are blue-gray with black markings. The chest is white with a chestnut band in the female. The legs are short and blue-gray in color.

Diet: The belted kingfisher is a fish eater. It will also eat crayfish, frogs, and insects.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a belted kingfisher in Florida is typically 10-12 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a belted kingfisher in Florida is typically 24-28 inches.

Calls

Rattler: This is the most common call of the belted kingfisher. It is a loud, rattling sound that is made by the male bird to attract a mate.

  • Drum: This is a loud, drumming sound that is made by the belted kingfisher by banging its bill against a tree or other hard surface. It is used to defend territory and to communicate with other birds.
  • Peep: This is a soft, high-pitched call that is made by the female belted kingfisher to call to her young.
  • Mew: This is a soft, mewing sound that is made by the young belted kingfishers.

Seasons: 

Winter: Belted kingfishers are still present in Florida during the winter, but they are less common. They may migrate to warmer climates, but many will stay in Florida year-round.

  • Spring: The spring is the breeding season for belted kingfishers. They will be more active during this time, and you may see them building nests or raising young.
  • Summer: The summer is a good time to see belted kingfishers. They will be active and you may see them hunting for food or flying around.
  • Fall: The fall is a good time to see belted kingfishers before they migrate. They will be less active during this time, but you may still see them hunting for food or flying around.

17. Blue-winged teal

Blue-winged teal

Scientific name: Spatula discors

Size: The size of a Blue-winged Teal in Florida is typically between 14.2 and 16.1 inches (36 and 41 centimeters) in length and between 8.1 and 19.2 ounces (230 and 545 grams) in weight. The male is slightly larger than the female.

Appearance: The male has a blue wing patch and a green head. The female is brown with a white belly.

Diet: Blue-winged teals are omnivores, and their diet consists of a variety of insects, seeds, and aquatic plants.

Lifespan: Blue-winged teals in Florida have an average lifespan of 3-5 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a Blue-winged teal in Florida is typically between 22.1 and 24.4 inches (56 and 62 centimeters)

Calls: 

Male: A loud, high-pitched whistle or a nasal bleat.

Female: Loud, evenly spaced quacks.

Seasons: Blue-winged teals are migratory birds, and they spend the winter in Florida. They arrive in Florida in September and October, and they leave in March and April.

18. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

Scientific name: Polioptila caerulea

Size: The Blue-gray Gnatcatcher is a small bird, measuring 10-13 cm (3.9-5.1 in) in length. 

Appearance: The Blue-gray Gnatcatcher is a small, slender bird with a long tail. It is blue-gray on the back and head, and white on the belly. The Blue-gray Gnatcatcher has a thin, dark bill and a white eye ring.

Diet: They are insectivores, meaning that they eat insects. Their diet consists of a variety of small insects, including flies, beetles, wasps, and caterpillars. They will also eat spiders and other invertebrates.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher in Florida is typically 3-5 years

Wingspan: The wingspan of a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher in Florida is typically 6.3 inches (16 cm).

Calls: 

  • Contact call: A high-pitched, nasal “zeee” or “chay” call that is used to keep in touch with mates and other Blue-gray Gnatcatchers.
  • Alarm call: A sharp, descending “tseet” or “tseep” call that is used to warn of danger.
  • Mobbing call: A series of high-pitched, harsh calls that are used to mob predators.

Seasons: Blue-gray gnatcatchers are migratory birds, and they breed in Florida during the spring and summer months. They arrive in Florida in March or April, and they leave in September or October.

19. Florida scrub Jay

Florida scrub Jay

Scientific name: Aphelocoma coerulescens

Size: The Florida scrub jay is a small bird, measuring 9.1 to 11.0 inches (23 to 28 cm) in length

Appearance: The Florida scrub jay has a crest on its head and a long tail.

Diet: 

  • Insects: Insects are a major part of the Florida scrub jay’s diet, and they will eat a variety of insects, including beetles, grasshoppers, crickets, and caterpillars.
  • Acorns: Acorns are another important food source for the Florida scrub jay, and they will often bury acorns in the ground for later consumption.
  • Fruits: Florida scrub jays will also eat fruits, such as berries, grapes, and figs.
  • Nuts: Florida scrub jays will also eat nuts, such as hickory nuts and pecans.
  • Small vertebrates: Florida scrub jays will also eat small vertebrates, such as lizards, snakes, and mice.

Lifespan: The Florida scrub-jay is a small blue jay that is found in Florida. It is a threatened species and its lifespan in the wild is typically 4-10 years.

Wingspan: The Florida scrub jay has a wingspan of 13 to 14 inches (33 to 36 cm).

Calls:

  • Chirp: This is a short, high-pitched call that is used to communicate with other birds in the flock.
  • Jay call: This is a loud, harsh call that is used to warn other birds of danger.
  • Whistle: This is a soft, high-pitched call that is used to communicate with mates and offspring.

Seasons: Florida Scrub-Jays are year-round residents in Florida, although their breeding season is from March to June.

20. Bluebird 

Bluebird 

Scientific name: Sialia sialis

Size: The size of a bluebird in Florida varies depending on the subspecies, but they are all generally small birds. The average length of an adult eastern bluebird is 6-8 inches. 

Appearance:  It has a bright blue back, head, and tail, with a chestnut-colored throat and breast and a white belly.

Diet: Bluebirds in Florida are insectivores, meaning they eat mostly insects. They will also eat berries and fruit, but insects make up the majority of their diet. Bluebirds are important predators of insects, helping to control populations of pests such as grasshoppers, beetles, and caterpillars.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a bluebird in Florida is typically 6 to 10 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a bluebird in Florida is typically 9 to 12 inches.

Calls:

  • Warble: This is a soft, warbling call that is used for communication between mates and for attracting mates.
  • Chip: This is a short, sharp call that is used to signal alarm or to attract attention. 
  • Melody: This is a longer, more complex call that is used to attract mates and to defend territory.

Seasons: Bluebirds are year-round residents in Florida. However, they are most active during the breeding season, which typically runs from February to August.

21. Blue Jay

Blue Jay

Scientific name: Cyanocitta cristata

Size: Blue Jays measure about 9 to 12 inches (23 to 30 centimeters) in length from beak to tail.

Appearance: The Blue Jay is primarily known for its vibrant blue feathers, which cover most of its body. The intense blue coloration is most noticeable on the bird’s crest, back, wings, and tail. The shade of blue may vary slightly among individuals, but it generally stands out prominently.

White Underparts : The underparts of the Blue Jay are predominantly white, providing a stark contrast to its blue feathers. The white coloration extends from the throat down to the belly and under the tail.

Diet: 

  • Seeds and Nuts: Blue Jays have a strong preference for seeds and nuts. They feed on a wide range of plant seeds, including those from trees, shrubs, and grasses. Common seeds consumed by Blue Jays in Florida include acorns, hickory nuts, beechnuts, and pine seeds.
  • Fruits and Berries: Blue Jays readily consume fruits and berries when available. They feed on a variety of wild fruits, such as blackberries, blueberries, cherries, and grapes. They also enjoy the fruits of native trees and shrubs, including hawthorns and dogwoods.
  • Insects and Invertebrates: Blue Jays are opportunistic feeders and include insects and invertebrates in their diet. They forage on the ground and in trees, searching for caterpillars, grasshoppers, beetles, spiders, and other small arthropods. Insects and invertebrates provide them with protein and essential nutrients.
  • Eggs and Nestlings: Blue Jays are known to opportunistically prey on the eggs and nestlings of other bird species. They may raid nests to consume eggs, young birds, or even steal food caches of other jays or squirrels.
  • Small Vertebrates: Blue Jays occasionally feed on small vertebrates, such as lizards, frogs, and small snakes. They may also scavenge on carrion when available.
  • Human-Provided Food: Blue Jays are adaptable and often take advantage of food sources provided by humans. They may visit bird feeders to consume seeds, nuts, or suet. It’s important to offer them appropriate and nutritious food, avoiding items high in salt, sugar, or artificial additives.

Lifespan: Blue Jays in the wild typically live for around 7 to 10 years.

Wingspan: The Blue Jay, a blue bird species found in Florida, typically has a wingspan that ranges from 13 to 17 inches (33 to 43 centimeters).

Calls:

  • Jeer Calls: Blue Jays are famous for their loud and distinctive “jeer” calls, which sound like a harsh “jay-jay” or “jay-jeer.” These calls are often repeated multiple times in a row and are used for various purposes, including territorial defense and communicating warnings to other Blue Jays in the area.
  • Bell-like Calls: Blue Jays are also known for their bell-like calls, which are softer and more melodic compared to their jeer calls. These calls are often described as a series of musical notes or whistles and can be heard during calm moments or when the birds are perched.
  • Whisper Song: The Blue Jay has a softer and more subtle vocalization known as the “whisper song.” This song is typically sung in a low, almost whisper-like tone and is often associated with courtship behavior during the breeding season. It is a gentle and alluring call used by males to attract females.
  • Mimicry: Blue Jays are talented mimics and can imitate the calls of other bird species, including hawks, crows, and even some mammal sounds. This ability to mimic allows them to deceive potential predators or other birds and adds to their vocal versatility.
  • Alarm Calls: When Blue Jays perceive a potential threat or danger, they emit loud and rapid alarm calls. These calls are sharp and attention-grabbing, serving to alert other birds in the area about the presence of predators or intruders.

Seasons: The breeding season for Blue Jays in Florida typically occurs from late spring through summer.

Frequently asked question (FAQ) – blue birds in Florida

Q1: What are some examples of the beautiful blue bird species found in Florida?

 Some examples of beautiful blue bird species found in Florida include the Eastern Bluebird, Indigo Bunting, Blue Grosbeak, Blue Jay, Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, and Painted Bunting.

Q2: Where can I spot these blue bird species in Florida?

Blue bird species can be found in various habitats across Florida, including wetlands, coastal regions, forests, and gardens. 

Q3: Are these blue birds migratory or year-round residents in Florida?

The blue bird species in Florida can have different migration patterns. Some are year-round residents, while others migrate to Florida during certain seasons.

Q4: What is the significance of blue birds in Florida’s ecosystems?

 Blue birds play a significant role in Florida’s ecosystems. They assist with pollination, seed dispersal, and insect control, contributing to the overall health and balance of the environment.

Q5: How can I attract bluebirds to my backyard in Florida?

 To attract bluebirds to your backyard in Florida, you can provide suitable habitats and food sources.

Q6: Are there any conservation efforts in place to protect bluebirds in Florida?

Yes, there are conservation efforts in place to protect bluebirds in Florida. Organizations and agencies work towards preserving their habitats, implementing responsible land management practices, and raising awareness about the importance of conserving these species.

Q7: Can I take photographs or observe these blue birds in Florida?

Yes, you can take photographs or observe these blue birds in Florida. 

Q8: Are there any threats to the blue bird populations in Florida?

 Blue birds in Florida face various threats, including habitat loss, pollution, climate change, and predation.

Q9: How can I get involved in blue bird conservation in Florida?

There are several ways to get involved in blue bird conservation in Florida. You can support local conservation organizations, participate in bird monitoring programs, volunteer for habitat restoration projects, and educate others about the importance of protecting these species and their habitats.

Q10: Are there any festivals or events dedicated to blue birds in Florida?

Yes, there are festivals and events dedicated to blue birds in Florida. These events often include birdwatching tours, educational workshops, and opportunities to celebrate and appreciate the beauty of blue birds. Keeping an eye on local conservation and nature organizations’ calendars will help you find such events in your area.

Conclusion: 

Florida is home to a stunning array of 21 beautiful blue bird in florida. These vibrant and captivating birds bring an extra touch of color to the state’s diverse ecosystems and add to its natural beauty. Whether it’s the vibrant Eastern Bluebird, the striking Indigo Bunting, or the regal Blue Grosbeak, each species contributes to the rich tapestry of avian life in Florida.

By celebrating and protecting the diversity of blue bird species in Florida, we can contribute to the conservation efforts aimed at safeguarding their habitats and preserving the natural heritage of the state. Together, we can ensure that these 21 beautiful blue birds continue to grace the skies of Florida, bringing joy and inspiration to all who encounter them.

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