brown birds in florida

Magnificent 25 brown birds in Florida

In the sun-soaked state of Florida, where vibrant wildlife flourishes amidst stunning landscapes, one can find a symphony of colors fluttering through the air. Among the countless inhabitants of Florida’s diverse avian community, there is a particular group that captivates both birdwatching enthusiasts and casual observers alike—the magnificent 25 brown birds in Florida . These winged wonders, adorned with a mesmerizing array of hues, possess a charm that is truly enchanting. As we delve into the world of these feathered gems, prepare to embark on a captivating journey through Florida’s skies, where nature’s artistry is on full display.

To ensure a successful and fulfilling experience observing the magnificent 25 brown birds in Florida, it’s essential to employ a few tips and best practices. Here are some guidelines to enhance your birdwatching adventure:

  • Research and identify: Familiarize yourself with the species that make up the magnificent 25 brown birds in Florida. Study their distinct features, behaviors, and preferred habitats. This knowledge will help you identify them accurately in the field.
  • Visit suitable habitats: These magnificent birds can be found in various habitats across Florida, such as wetlands, forests, and coastal areas. Research their preferred environments and plan your visits accordingly to increase your chances of spotting them.
  • Optimal timing: Different bird species may be more active during specific times of the day. Research the preferred feeding and mating patterns of the magnificent 25 brown birds and plan your birdwatching outings accordingly. Early mornings and late afternoons are generally good times to observe birds when they are most active.
  • Be patient and observant: Birdwatching requires patience and keen observation skills. Find a comfortable spot and settle in quietly, allowing the birds to acclimate to your presence. Remain attentive to their movements, calls, and behavior, as this will aid in identifying different species and capturing their unique moments.
  • Use appropriate equipment: Invest in a good pair of binoculars to enhance your birdwatching experience. Opt for those with higher magnification and good light transmission. Additionally, consider carrying a field guide or a birding app on your smartphone to help you quickly identify the magnificent 25 brown birds.
  • Respect their habitats: When observing these beautiful birds, it’s crucial to respect their natural habitats. Avoid disturbing nests, trampling vegetation, or causing any harm to the environment. Maintain a safe distance to avoid causing stress to the birds or disrupting their activities.
  • Join birding communities or guided tours: Engaging with local birding communities or joining guided tours can provide valuable insights and opportunities to observe the magnificent 25 brown birds in the company of experienced birdwatchers. They can share their expertise, point out specific species, and provide valuable information on birding hotspots.
  • Document and share responsibly: Capture photographs or record observations of the birds you encounter, but remember to do so responsibly. Avoid disturbing the birds for the sake of getting the perfect shot. Share your sightings with fellow birdwatchers, contributing to citizen science initiatives or online birding communities to aid conservation efforts.

By following these tips and practices, you can enhance your chances of observing and appreciating the magnificent 25 brown birds in Florida while ensuring their welfare and contributing to the conservation of these beautiful creatures.

List of magnificent 25 brown birds in Florida: 

  1. Chipping Sparrow
  2. Field Sparrow
  3. House Sparrow
  4. Song Sparrow
  5. Savannah Sparrow
  6. Swamp Sparrow
  7. House Wren
  8. Winter Wren
  9. Swainson’s thrush
  10. Hermit thrush
  11. Pine Siskin
  12. Cedar Waxwing
  13. Mourning Dove
  14. Common Yellowthroat
  15. House Finch
  16. Wood thrush
  17. White-throated Sparrow
  18. Brown thrasher 
  19. Brown Creeper
  20. Eastern Phoebe
  21. Northern Waterthrush
  22. American Robin
  23. Brown Pelican
  24. Carolina wren 
  25. Marsh Wren

1. Chipping Sparrow

chipping sparrow
chipping sparrow

Scientific name: Spizella passerina

Size: The Chipping Sparrow is a small bird, measuring about 4.7-5.9 inches (12-15 cm) in length

How to identify: The Chipping Sparrow has a brown back, white belly, and a distinctive reddish cap. The female is slightly duller than the male. The Chipping Sparrow’s back is streaked with brown and black. The belly is white, with some brown streaking. The cap is reddish, with a black eye line.

Habitat: Chipping sparrows are found in a variety of habitats in Florida, including:

  • Woodlands: Chipping sparrows are often found in open woodlands, such as pine forests and oak savannas
  • Gardens: Chipping sparrows are also common in gardens and parks, especially those with plenty of ground cover.
  • Fields: Chipping sparrows can also be found in fields and meadows, especially those with short grasses.
  • Edges: Chipping sparrows are often found at the edges of habitats, such as where woodlands meet fields or where gardens meet open areas.

Diet: The diet of the Chipping Sparrow in Florida is varied, but it mainly consists of seeds, insects, and spiders.

  • Seeds: Chipping sparrows eat a variety of seeds, including those of grasses, weeds, and grain crops. They often eat seeds that have fallen to the ground, but they will also glean seeds from plants.
  • Insects: Chipping sparrows eat a variety of insects, including caterpillars, beetles, grasshoppers, and flies. They often catch insects in mid-air, but they will also glean insects from plants and the ground.
  • Spiders: Chipping sparrows also eat spiders, which they often catch in mid-air.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a Chipping Sparrow in Florida is typically 4-5 years,

Wingspan: The wingspan of a chipping sparrow in Florida is about 8.3 inches (21 cm).

Calls: Here are some calls that the chipping sparrow makes:

  • A sharp “tseet” or “tsew” call, which is given when the bird is alarmed.
  • A soft “whinny” call, which is given by females to attract mates.
  • A “chewink” call, which is given by both sexes during the breeding season.

Seasons: Chipping sparrows are common in Florida year-round, but they are most abundant during the winter months. They arrive in Florida in October and November, and they stay until April or May. During the summer, they breed in the northern United States and Canada.

Here is a breakdown of the seasons when chipping sparrows can be seen in Florida:

  • Fall: October-November
  • Winter: December-March
  • Spring: April-May

2. Field Sparrow

field sparrow
field sparrow

Scientific name: Spizella pusilla

Size: The field sparrow is a small bird, measuring about 4.7-5.9 inches (12-15 cm) in length

How to identify: The field sparrow is brown with black and buff streaks on the upperparts. The head is gray with a rufous crown. The underparts are buff, with a white belly. The tail is forked. The bill is pink and short. The field sparrow has a white eye-ring.

Habitat: The field sparrow is a bird of open habitats, and it can be found in a variety of habitats in Florida, including:

  • Fields: Field sparrows are most common in open fields, especially those with scattered shrubs or trees.
  • Meadows: Field sparrows can also be found in meadows, especially those that are overgrown with weeds and grasses.
  • Edge habitats: Field sparrows are also found in edge habitats, such as the edges of forests, woodlands, and marshes.
  • Shrubs: Field sparrows will also nest in shrubs, especially thorny shrubs such as roses and briars.
  • Low trees: Field sparrows will sometimes nest in low trees, especially those that are near open areas. 

Diet: The field sparrow is an omnivore, and its diet consists of a variety of insects, seeds, and berries. In Florida, their diet consists of:

  • Insects: Insects make up the majority of the field sparrow’s diet in the summer. They eat a variety of insects, including beetles, grasshoppers, caterpillars, and spiders.
  • Seeds: Seeds are the most important food source for field sparrows in the winter. They eat a variety of seeds, including grass seeds, weed seeds, and berry seeds.
  • Berries: Field sparrows will also eat berries, especially in the fall. They eat a variety of berries, including blackberry, raspberry, and blueberry.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a field sparrow in Florida is typically 3-5 years,

Wingspan: The wingspan of a field sparrow in Florida is typically 7.9 inches (20 cm).

Calls: Field sparrows have a variety of calls, including:

  • Song: The field sparrow’s song is a long, complex trill. It is often described as sounding like “sweet, sweet, sweet, I’m so sweet.” The song is most often given by males during the breeding season, but it can also be given by females and juveniles.
  • Contact call: The field sparrow’s contact call is a short, high-pitched “seep.” This call is used to keep in touch with other field sparrows, especially during the breeding season.
  • Alarm call: The field sparrow’s alarm call is a sharp, high-pitched “chip.” This call is used to warn other field sparrows of danger. 
  • Nesting call: The field sparrow’s nesting call is a soft, warbled “churr.” This call is used by females to attract mates and to keep track of their young.

Seasons:

Field sparrows are migratory birds, and they spend the winter in the southern United States and Mexico. They arrive in Florida in the spring, typically in March or April. They breed in Florida from April to August, and then they migrate back south in the fall.

3. House Sparrow

house sparrow
house sparrow

Scientific name: Passer domesticus.

Size: The size of a house sparrow in Florida is about 16 centimeters (6.3 inches) long. 

How to identify:  Male house sparrows have a gray head, white cheeks, a black bib, and rufous neck. The female is a plain buffy-brown overall with dingy gray-brown underparts. Their backs are noticeably striped with buff, black, and brown.

Habitat: House sparrows are strongly associated with human habitation, and can live in urban or rural settings. They are often found in parks, gardens, and other areas where there is food and water.

  • Cities: House sparrows are common in cities, where they can find food and shelter in buildings. They are often seen fluttering down from eaves and fencerows to hop and peck at crumbs or birdseed.
  • Suburbs: House sparrows are also common in suburbs, where they can find food and shelter in gardens and backyards. They are often seen nesting in bird houses or in cavities in buildings.
  • Farms: House sparrows are sometimes found on farms, where they can find food and shelter in barns and other outbuildings. They are also known to eat insects that can damage crops.
  • Natural areas: House sparrows can occasionally be found in natural areas, such as parks and forests. However, they are more likely to be found in areas that have been modified by humans, such as roadsides and golf courses.

Diet:
House sparrows are omnivorous birds, and their diet consists of seeds, insects, and other small animals. In Florida, their diet includes:

  • Seeds: House sparrows eat a variety of seeds, including corn, millet, wheat, and sunflower seeds. They are also known to eat birdseed that is provided in backyard feeders.
  • Insects: House sparrows eat a variety of insects, including beetles, flies, ants, and caterpillars. They are also known to eat spiders and other small invertebrates.
  • Other small animals: House sparrows will also eat small animals, such as snails, slugs, and frogs. They have even been known to eat young birds.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a house sparrow in Florida is typically 2-3 years. 

Wingspan: The wingspan of a house sparrow in Florida is typically 7.5-9.8 inches (19-25 cm).

Calls: House sparrows have a variety of calls, including:

  • Cheep: This is a short, high-pitched call that is often used as a contact call between individuals.
  • Chirp: This is a slightly longer, more mellow call that is often used as a social call.
  • Tseep: This is a high-pitched, nasal call that is often used as an alarm call.
  • Ziz: This is a low-pitched, buzzing call that is often used as a courtship call.

Seasons:
House sparrows can be found in Florida year-round, but they are most active during the breeding season, which typically runs from March to August.

4. Song Sparrow

song sparrow
song sparrow

Scientific name: Melospiza melodia

Size: The size of a song sparrow in Florida can vary depending on the subspecies, but they typically measure 4.7-6.7 inches (12-17 cm) in length.

How to identify: Song sparrows are medium-sized sparrows with a short, stout bill and a rounded head. The tail is long and rounded, and the wings are broad. Song sparrows are brown birds with streaky chests and flanks. The head is an attractive mix of warm red-brown and slaty gray, though these shades, as well as the amount of streaking, vary extensively across North America.

Habitat: Song sparrows are found in a variety of habitats, including forests, fields, and gardens. They are most common in wet, shrubby, and open areas.Song sparrows are found in a variety of habitats in Florida, including:

  • Wetlands: Song sparrows are often found near wetlands, such as marshes, swamps, and ponds. They can also be found in wet meadows and along streams.
  • Shrublands: Song sparrows are also found in shrublands, such as thickets, hedgerows, and forest edges. They can also be found in gardens and parks.
  • Open areas: Song sparrows can also be found in open areas, such as fields, meadows, and golf courses. They are often seen flitting through the grass or perched on a fence post or low branch.

Diet: Here is a detailed breakdown of the diet of a song sparrow in Florida:

  • Insects: Insects make up the majority of the diet of a song sparrow in the summer. They eat a variety of insects, including beetles, caterpillars, grasshoppers, and spiders.
  • Seeds: Song sparrows also eat a variety of seeds, including those of grasses, weeds, and fruits. They are especially fond of seeds from blackberries, blueberries, and raspberries.
  • Berries: In the winter, song sparrows eat more berries. They will eat a variety of berries, including blackberries, blueberries, raspberries, mulberries, and wild cherries.
  • Other foods: Song sparrows will also eat other foods, such as small snails, earthworms, and the droppings of other birds.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a song sparrow in Florida is typically 3-5 years. 

Wingspan: The wingspan of a song sparrow in Florida is typically 7.1-9.4 inches (18-24 cm).

Calls: The song sparrow also has a number of other calls, including:

  • Chip call: This is a short, sharp call that is often given as a contact call or to warn of danger.
  • Tseep call: This is a soft, high-pitched call that is often given by juveniles.
  • Chatter call: This is a harsh, scolding call that is often given by females during nest-building or when defending their territory.

Seasons: Here is a detailed breakdown of the seasons of a song sparrow in Florida:

  • Spring: Song sparrows arrive in Florida in the spring, around March or April. They start to sing their songs around this time, and they begin to build their nests.
  • Summer: Song sparrows breed in the summer. They lay 4-6 eggs, and the eggs hatch after about 12-15 days. The young birds fledge after about 10-12 days.
  • Fall: Song sparrows leave Florida in the fall, around October or November. They migrate to the southern United States and Mexico to overwinter.

5. Savannah Sparrow

savannah sparrow
savannah sparrow

Scientific name: Passerculus sandwichensis

Size: The Savannah Sparrow is a small bird, measuring about 4.3 to 5.9 inches (11 to 15 cm) in length

How to identify: It has a short tail and a small head. The Savannah Sparrow is a brown bird with a streaked breast and belly. The male bird has a blackish cap and a white throat. The female bird is similar to the male, but her cap is browner and her throat is not as white.

Habitat: The Savannah Sparrow is a common bird in Florida, and can be found in a variety of habitats, including fields, meadows, and marshes. It is a relatively easy bird to spot, and its small size and brown coloration make it difficult to miss. The Savannah Sparrow is a grassland bird that is found in a variety of habitats, including:

  • Fields: Savannah Sparrows are often found in open fields, such as hayfields, cornfields, and soybean fields.
  • Meadows: Savannah Sparrows can also be found in meadows, such as prairies, marshes, and dunes.
  • Edges: Savannah Sparrows are often found on the edges of habitats, such as the edges of fields, forests, and wetlands.
  • Wetlands: Savannah Sparrows can also be found in wetlands, such as salt marshes, freshwater marshes, and bogs.

Diet:  The Savannah Sparrow is an omnivore, and its diet consists of a variety of insects, seeds, and berries.

  • Insects: Savannah Sparrows eat a variety of insects, including grasshoppers, beetles, caterpillars, flies, and spiders. They typically forage for insects on the ground, but they will also fly up to catch insects in mid-air.
  • Seeds: Savannah Sparrows eat a variety of seeds, including grass seeds, weed seeds, and berry seeds. They typically eat seeds that are found on the ground, but they will also eat seeds from plants.
  • Berries: Savannah Sparrows eat a variety of berries, including blueberries, blackberries, and raspberries. They typically eat berries that are found on the ground, but they will also eat berries from plants.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a Savannah Sparrow in Florida is typically 2-3 years. 

Wingspan: The wingspan of a Savannah Sparrow in Florida is typically 7.9-8.7 inches (20-22 cm).

Calls: The Savannah Sparrow also has a number of other calls, including a sharp “tsip” call that is used to attract mates, a soft “churr” call that is used to communicate with other birds, and a “chip” call that is used to warn of danger.

Seasons: The Savannah Sparrow is a migratory bird that breeds in North America and winters in Central and South America. In Florida, Savannah Sparrows can be seen from September to June. They are most common during the winter months, from December to February.

During the breeding season, Savannah Sparrows can be found in a variety of habitats, including fields, meadows, and marshes. They build their nests on the ground, often in a clump of grass or weeds. The female lays 4-6 eggs, which hatch after about 12 days. The young birds fledge after about 10 days.

In the winter, Savannah Sparrows migrate to warmer climates. They typically travel in flocks, and they often stop to rest and feed at bird feeders.

6. Swamp Sparrow

swamp sparrow
swamp sparrow

Scientific name:  Melospiza georgiana.

Size: The Swamp Sparrow is a medium-sized sparrow, measuring 4.7-5.9 inches (12-15 cm) in length

How to identify: The Swamp Sparrow has a rusty cap and wings, with a grayish-brown body. The belly is white. The female is similar in appearance to the male, but the rusty cap is less pronounced. The bill is short and thick. The base of the bill is yellow.

Habitat: The Swamp Sparrow is a wetland bird that is found in marshes, swamps, and other wet areas throughout the eastern United States and Canada. In Florida, the Swamp Sparrow can be found in a variety of wetland habitats, including:

  • Freshwater marshes: These marshes are typically dominated by grasses, sedges, and cattails.
  • Brackish marshes: These marshes are located near the coast and have a mix of freshwater and saltwater plants.
  • Salt marshes: These marshes are located along the coast and are dominated by salt-tolerant plants.
  • Wet meadows: These meadows are typically found in areas that are periodically flooded.
  • Streamside thickets: These thickets are found along the edges of streams and rivers.

Diet:
The Swamp Sparrow is an insectivore, meaning that it eats insects. Its diet consists of a variety of insects, including beetles, caterpillars, grasshoppers, crickets, ants, and others. It also eats some seeds, such as those of grasses, sedges, and smartweed.

Lifespan: The average lifespan of a Swamp Sparrow in Florida is 71 months.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a Swamp Sparrow in Florida is 7.1-7.5 inches (18-19 cm).

Calls: The Swamp Sparrow has a number of different calls, including:

  • Song: The song of the Swamp Sparrow is a simple, rich, slow trill, delivered from a perch above the marsh grasses. The song is often described as sounding like “sweet seet, sweet seet.”
  • Call note: The call note of the Swamp Sparrow is a high-pitched “chink” or “chip.” This call is often given when the bird is alarmed or when it is calling to its mate.
  • Nesting call: The nesting call of the Swamp Sparrow is a series of high-pitched “chip” or “tseep” notes. This call is given by the female when she is sitting on the nest, and it is used to attract the male to the nest.

Seasons: 

Season Description 
SpringThe breeding season begins in April and ends in August.
SummerThe young birds fledge after about 14 days.
FallThe birds begin to migrate south, if necessary.
WinterSome birds may remain in Florida, while others migrate south.

7. House Wren

house wren
house wren

Scientific name: Troglodytes aedon

Size: The House Wren is a small bird, measuring 11-13 cm (4.3-5.1 in) in length

How to identify: It has a long, thin bill and a short tail. The plumage is brown overall, with darker barring on the wings and tail. The underparts are paler than the upperparts. The House Wren has a faint white eyebrow stripe, but this is often difficult to see.

Habitat: The House Wren is a common bird in Florida, and can be found in a variety of habitats, including backyards, gardens, and forests. It prefers areas with dense vegetation, where it can find insects to eat.

Diet: The House Wren is an insectivore, which means that it eats insects. They eat a wide variety of insects, including beetles, caterpillars, spiders, and ants. They will also eat spiders, snails, and millipedes.

Lifespan: The average lifespan of a House Wren in Florida is 2-3 years

Wingspan: The wingspan of a House Wren in Florida is typically around 15 cm (5.9 in).

Calls: The House Wren is a very vocal bird, and it has a variety of calls. The most common call is a jumbled, rapid series of notes that is often described as “rush-and-jumble”. This call is used to attract mates and defend territory.

House Wrens also make a variety of other calls, including:

  • A sharp, scolding “tchirr” call that is used to warn off predators
  • A soft, warbling “churr” call that is used to communicate with mates and young
  • A high-pitched “seep” call that is used to attract attention

Seasons: The House Wren is a year-round resident in Florida. However, there are some seasonal changes in their behavior.

During the breeding season, which is from March to August, House Wrens are very active and vocal. They will defend their territory vigorously and sing loudly to attract mates. They will also build their nests and raise their young during this time.

After the breeding season, House Wrens become less active and vocal. They will often molt their feathers and prepare for the winter. They may also migrate to warmer areas if the weather becomes too cold.

8. Winter Wren

winter wren
winter wren

Scientific name: Troglodytes hiemalis

Size: The Winter Wren is the smallest songbird in North America, measuring just 3.1 to 4.7 inches in length.

How to identify: The Winter Wren is brown overall, with darker brown barring on the wings and tail. It has a pale tan eyebrow stripe above the eye and a plain brown cap. Its unmarked throat and barred belly are pale tan, paler than the back.

Habitat: Here are some specific habitats where you can find Winter Wrens in Florida:

  • Evergreen forests: Winter Wrens are often found in evergreen forests, especially those with a dense understory of shrubs and vines. They are attracted to these areas because they provide plenty of places to hide and nest.
  • Deciduous forests: Winter Wrens can also be found in deciduous forests, especially those with a lot of downed logs and standing dead trees. These areas provide plenty of food and nesting opportunities for Winter Wrens.
  • Backyards: Winter Wrens will sometimes even venture into backyards, especially if there are plenty of trees and shrubs for them to hide in. If you have a backyard that is home to a variety of native plants, you may be surprised to see a Winter Wren or two flitting about.

Diet: Here are some of the insects that Winter Wrens eat:

  • Beetles: Winter Wrens eat a variety of beetles, including ground beetles, leaf beetles, and bark beetles.
  • Ants: Ants are a major food source for Winter Wrens, and they often eat ants that are found in the understory of forests.
  • Flies: Winter Wrens eat a variety of flies, including mosquitoes, gnats, and horseflies.
  • Mites: Winter Wrens eat mites that are found on plants and animals.
  • Caterpillars: Winter Wrens eat caterpillars that are found on trees and shrubs.
  • Millipedes: Winter Wrens eat millipedes that are found in the understory of forests.
  • Spiders: Winter Wrens eat spiders that are found on webs or on the ground.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a Winter Wren in Florida is typically 3 to 5 years. 

Wingspan: The wingspan of a Winter Wren in Florida is typically 4.7 to 6.3 inches.

Calls: Here are some of the calls of the Winter Wren:

  • Song: The song of the Winter Wren is a cascading, bubbly song that lasts about 5–10 seconds. Each song is made up of dozens of bell-like notes that the bird combines and changes up from time to time.
  • Chip: The chip call of the Winter Wren is a sharp, single note that is used to communicate with other birds. It is often used to warn other birds of danger.
  • Klip: The klip call of the Winter Wren is a soft, single note that is used to attract mates. It is often used in conjunction with the song.

Seasons: The Winter Wren is a non-migratory bird, which means that it stays in Florida year-round. However, the Winter Wren is more common in Florida during the winter months, from November to March.

9. Swainson’s thrush

swainson's thrush
swainson’s thrush

Scientific name: Catharus ustulatus ustulatus.

Size: The size of a Swainson’s thrush brown bird in Florida is about 6.3 to 7.5 inches long.

How to identify:  It has a slender build with a round head and a short, straight bill. The wings are fairly long and the tail is medium-length. The Swainson’s thrush has a brown back and wings, a pale underbelly, and a buffy eyering. The throat is white with dark brown stripes on either side.

Habitat: Swainson’s thrushes are found in a variety of habitats in Florida, including:

  • Deciduous and coniferous forests
  • Thickets
  • Swamps
  • Wooded areas near streams
  • Urban parks

Diet: Swainson’s thrushes are insectivores, meaning they eat insects. Their diet consists of a variety of insects, including beetles, ants, caterpillars, crickets, wasps, flies, moths, and others. They will also eat spiders and other invertebrates. Berries and fruits make up over one-third of their summer diet. In the winter, their diet in the tropics is not well known, but they are often found in fruiting trees there.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a Swainson’s thrush brown bird in Florida is typically 4-6 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a Swainson’s thrush brown bird in Florida is typically 11.4 to 12.2 inches.

Calls: The Swainson’s thrush brown bird in Florida makes a variety of calls, including:

  • Song: The song of the Swainson’s thrush is a long, descending flute-like warble. It is often described as “whistling” or “warbling.”
  • Contact call: The contact call of the Swainson’s thrush is a soft “chip.”
  • Alarm call: The alarm call of the Swainson’s thrush is a sharp “tseet.”
  • Nestling call: The nestling call of the Swainson’s thrush is a high-pitched “cheep.”

Seasons: 

Swainson’s thrushes are migratory birds, and they can be seen in Florida during two seasons: spring and fall.

  • Spring: Swainson’s thrushes arrive in Florida in the spring, typically in April or May. They breed in the northern and central parts of the state, and they nest in the ground or in low-hanging branches. The female lays 3-5 eggs, which hatch after about 12 days. The young birds fledge after about 14 days.
  • Fall: Swainson’s thrushes depart Florida in the fall, typically in September or October. They migrate to Central and South America for the winter.

11. Hermit thrush

hermit thrush
hermit thrush

Scientific name: Catharus guttatus

Size: The Hermit Thrush is a medium-sized bird, measuring 5.5-7.1 inches (14-18 cm) in length

How to identify: The Hermit Thrush has a rich brown upper body and smudged spots on the breast. The underparts are pale with distinct spots on the throat. The tail is reddish.

Habitat: The Hermit Thrush is not a resident of Florida, so it does not have a habitat in the state. However, it does migrate through Florida during the winter months. During this time, it can be found in a variety of habitats, including:

  • Deciduous forests: The Hermit Thrush prefers deciduous forests, especially those with thick undergrowth.
  • Evergreen forests: The Hermit Thrush will also visit evergreen forests, especially those with mixed deciduous trees.
  • Wooded swamps: The Hermit Thrush can also be found in wooded swamps, especially those with a variety of trees.
  • Parks and gardens: The Hermit Thrush may also visit parks and gardens, especially those with mature trees.

Diet: The Hermit Thrush is an insectivore, meaning that it eats insects. Its diet also includes spiders, earthworms, and small berries. The Hermit Thrush forages on the ground, picking up insects from leaf litter or soil. It also feeds up in shrubs and trees, often hovering momentarily while grabbing an insect or berry.

Lifespan: The average lifespan of a Hermit Thrush is 5-7 years. 

Wingspan: The wingspan of a Hermit Thrush is 9.8-11.4 inches (25-29 cm).

Calls: the Hermit Thrush does have a beautiful song that is often described as being melancholy or wistful. The song is a series of descending notes that are often repeated.

Seasons: The Hermit Thrush is not a resident of Florida, but it does migrate through the state during the winter months. It typically arrives in Florida in late October or early November, and it departs in late March or early April.

12. Pine Siskin

pine siskin
pine siskin

Scientific name: Spinus pinus

Size: They are small birds, measuring about 4.3-5.5 inches long

How to identify: Pine Siskins are brown overall, with heavy streaking on their underparts. They have yellow wing bars and a black cap. The Pine Siskin has a slender, pointed bill that is adapted for eating seeds.

Habitat: Pine Siskins are found in a variety of habitats in Florida, including:

  • Pine forests: Pine Siskins are most common in pine forests, where they can find their favorite food source, pine seeds.
  • Palmetto scrub: Pine Siskins can also be found in palmetto scrub, where they eat seeds from palmettos and other plants.
  • Backyards: Pine Siskins are often attracted to backyards that have feeders with thistle seeds, sunflower seeds, and other small seeds.
  • Fields: Pine Siskins can also be found in fields, where they eat seeds from weeds and grasses.

Diet:
Pine Siskins are seed eaters, and their diet consists mostly of small seeds from trees, shrubs, and weeds. Their favorite food sources include:

  • Pine seeds: Pine Siskins are most famous for their love of pine seeds. They will eat the seeds from a variety of pine trees, including white pine, red pine, and Scotch pine.
  • Thistle seeds: Thistle seeds are another favorite food of Pine Siskins. They can be found in thistle plants, as well as in thistle seed mixes that are sold for bird feeders.
  • Sunflower seeds: Sunflower seeds are another popular food for Pine Siskins. They can be found in sunflower seed mixes, as well as in whole sunflower seeds.
  • Alder seeds: Alder seeds are a good source of food for Pine Siskins during the winter months. They can be found in alder trees, as well as in alder seed mixes.
  • Birch seeds: Birch seeds are another good source of food for Pine Siskins during the winter months. They can be found in birch trees, as well as in birch seed mixes.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a Pine Siskin in Florida is typically 2-3 years. 

Wingspan: The wingspan of a Pine Siskin in Florida is typically 7.1-8.7 inches.

Calls:
Pine Siskins have a variety of calls, including:

  • A high-pitched “zeee” or “zreet” call. This is the most common call of the Pine Siskin, and it is often used to communicate with other birds.
  • A soft, warbling song. This song is more often heard during the breeding season, and it is used to attract mates.
  • A sharp, scolding call. This call is used to warn other birds of danger.

Seasons: Pine Siskins are most common in Florida during the winter months, from November to March. However, they can sometimes be seen in Florida during the summer months, especially if there is a shortage of food in their northern breeding grounds.

13. Cedar Waxwing

cedar waxwing
cedar waxwing

Scientific name: Bombycilla cedrorum

Size: The Cedar Waxwing is a medium-sized bird, measuring about 5.5-6.7 inches in length

How to identify: Cedar Waxwings are brown birds with a pale yellow belly and a bright yellow tip on their tail. They have a black mask on their face, with white outlining the mask. The Cedar Waxwing also has red wax droplets on the tips of its wing feathers. These wax droplets are not actually wax, but they are a type of secretion that is produced by the bird’s feathers.

Habitat:  Cedar Waxwings are found in a variety of habitats, including deciduous, coniferous, and mixed woodlands. They are also found in urban areas, where they may be attracted to bird feeders. Here are some of the preferred habitats of Cedar Waxwings in Florida:

  • Deciduous woodlands: Cedar Waxwings prefer to live in deciduous woodlands, especially those that have a variety of berry-producing trees and shrubs. Some of the trees and shrubs that Cedar Waxwings like to eat from include cedars, dogwoods, mulberries, and serviceberries.
  • Coniferous woodlands: Cedar Waxwings will also live in coniferous woodlands, especially those that have a lot of spruce and pine trees. These trees produce cones, which are a good source of food for Cedar Waxwings.
  • Mixed woodlands: Cedar Waxwings will also live in mixed woodlands, which are areas that have a mix of deciduous and coniferous trees. These areas provide Cedar Waxwings with a variety of food options, as well as shelter from predators.
  • Urban areas: Cedar Waxwings are also found in urban areas, where they may be attracted to bird feeders. Some of the fruits that Cedar Waxwings like to eat from bird feeders include raisins, grapes, and apples.

Diet: Cedar Waxwings are omnivorous, and their diet includes fruit, berries, insects, and sap. They are especially fond of berries, and they will often gather in large flocks to feed on them. Some of the berries that Cedar Waxwings eat include cedar berries, dogwood berries, mulberries, serviceberries, and juniper berries.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a Cedar Waxwing in Florida is typically 3-5 years. 

Wingspan: The wingspan of a Cedar Waxwing in Florida is typically 8.7-11.8 inches.

Calls: Cedar Waxwings have two common calls: a high-pitched, trilled bzeee and a sighing whistle, about a half-second long, often rising in pitch at the beginning. Cedar Waxwings call often, especially in flight.

Seasons: The seasons of Cedar Waxwings in Florida are as follows:

  • Winter: Cedar Waxwings arrive in Florida in the fall, typically from November to December. They stay in Florida for the winter, and they often gather in large flocks to feed on berries.
  • Spring: Cedar Waxwings start to migrate north in the spring, typically from March to April. They typically breed in Canada and the northern United States, and they return to Florida in the fall.
  • Summer: Cedar Waxwings are not typically seen in Florida during the summer, as they are breeding in the north. However, some Cedar Waxwings may stay in Florida during the summer, especially if there is a good supply of food.

13. Mourning Dove

mourning dove
mourning dove

Scientific name: Zenaida macroura

Size: The mourning dove is a medium-sized bird, about 12 inches long

How to identify: Mourning doves are brown overall, with black spots on the wings and black-bordered white tips to the tail feathers.  Mourning doves have a plump body, short neck, and small head.

Habitat: Mourning doves are found in a variety of habitats in Florida, including:

  • Forests: Mourning doves are often seen in open woodlands, where they can find food and shelter.
  • Fields: Mourning doves are also found in fields and agricultural areas, where they can find seeds and grains.
  • Backyards: Mourning doves are increasingly common in backyards, where they are attracted to bird feeders and water sources.
  • Urban areas: Mourning doves can also be found in urban areas, where they can find food and shelter in parks, gardens, and other green spaces.

Diet:
Mourning doves are herbivores (granivores) and eat almost exclusively seeds, which make up more than 99% of their diet. They will eat a variety of seeds, including millet, corn, milo, sunflower seeds, and safflower seeds. They will also eat some fruits, such as berries and grapes. In Florida, some of the best plants for mourning doves include:

  • Sunflowers
  • Croton (goat weed or dove weed)
  • Ragweed
  • Partridge pea
  • Millet
  • Corn
  • Milo
  • Sunflower seeds
  • Safflower seeds

Mourning doves will also eat some insects, such as snails and caterpillars. However, insects make up a very small part of their diet.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a mourning dove in Florida is typically 1-2 years. 

Wingspan: The wingspan of a mourning dove in Florida is typically 17-19 inches.

Calls: Mourning doves also have a number of other calls, including:

  • Nest call: This is a three-parted call that is given by paired males while nest-building. It is a soft coo-oo followed by two or three louder coos.
  • Wing whistle: This is a high-pitched whistle that is given by both sexes in flight. It is thought to be used to communicate with other doves.
  • Alarm call: This is a loud, harsh call that is given when a dove is alarmed. It is thought to be used to warn other doves of danger.

Seasons:
Mourning doves are year-round residents in Florida, but they do have a breeding season. The breeding season for mourning doves in Florida typically begins in late February or early March and runs through October.

14. Common Yellowthroat

common yellow throat
common yellow throat

Scientific name: Geothlypis trichas

Size: The Common Yellowthroat is a small bird, measuring 4.3-5.1 inches (11-13 cm) in length

How to identify: Look for the black mask across the face of the male. This is the most distinctive feature of the Common Yellowthroat. The male also has a bright yellow throat, while the female is brown with a hint of yellow on the throat and under the tail.

Habitat: It is most commonly found in marshes, swamps, and other wetlands, but it can also be found in forests, thickets, and even backyards.

Diet: The Common Yellowthroat is an insectivore, and its diet consists mainly of insects, including mosquitoes, flies, and caterpillars. It will also eat spiders, small snails, and seeds.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a Common Yellowthroat in Florida is typically 5-7 years. 

Wingspan:
The wingspan of a Common Yellowthroat in Florida is typically 5.9-7.5 inches (15-19 cm).

Calls: Here is a list of some of the calls of the Common Yellowthroat:

  • Song: A repeated “wichety-wichety-wichety”
  • Chip: A sharp “chip” call
  • Chuck: A soft “chuck” call

Seasons: During the breeding season, which is from April to September, Common Yellowthroats are more active and vocal.

15. House Finch

house finch
house finch

Scientific name: Haemorhous mexicanus.

Size: The House Finch is a moderate-sized finch, measuring 12.5 to 15 centimeters (5 to 6 inches) long. 

How to identify: 

  • Color: Adult males are rosy red around the face and upper breast, with streaky brown back, belly and tail. Females are brown overall with a paler belly.
  • Tail: The tail of the House Finch is notched, with a shallow indentation in the center.
  • Beak: The beak of the House Finch is conical, with a slightly curved tip.

Habitat: House Finches are adaptable birds and can be found in a variety of habitats, including:

  • Urban and suburban areas: House Finches are often found in backyards, parks, and gardens. They are attracted to feeders that offer sunflower seeds, millet, and other small seeds.
  • Woodlands: House Finches can also be found in open woodlands, particularly those with a mix of trees and shrubs. They are often seen feeding in the understory, where they look for seeds and insects.
  • Deserts: In their native range, House Finches can be found in deserts, where they feed on seeds and insects.
  • Chaparral: House Finches can also be found in chaparral, which is a type of shrubland that is common in California and other parts of the western United States.

Diet: 

  • Seeds: House finches have a strong preference for seeds and consume a wide variety of them. They are particularly fond of small seeds like those from grasses, weeds, and wildflowers. Sunflower seeds are also a favored food source.
  • Fruits and Berries: House finches have a sweet tooth and readily consume various types of fruits and berries when available. They enjoy eating fruits such as strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, and blueberries.
  • Insects: While seeds form the bulk of their diet, house finches also consume insects, especially during the breeding season when they need additional protein for themselves and their offspring. They may feed on small insects like beetles, caterpillars, and ants.
  • Flower Nectar: House finches are known to visit flowers to feed on nectar, particularly during the spring and summer months. They may be attracted to flowers such as trumpet vines and honeysuckle.
  • Human-Provided Foods: House finches have adapted to urban environments and readily exploit human-provided food sources. They can be seen visiting bird feeders that contain seeds, suet, or other types of bird food.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a House Finch in Florida is typically 5-10 years. 

Wingspan: The wingspan of a House Finch in Florida is typically 20-25 cm (8-10 in).

Calls: The House Finch has a variety of calls, including:

  • Cheep: This is a short, sharp call that is often used as a contact call.
  • Chip: This is a slightly longer call that is also used as a contact call.
  • Warble: This is a longer, more complex call that is used as a song.
  • Squeak: This is a high-pitched call that is often used by young birds.

Seasons: Here is a detailed look at the seasons of the House Finch in Florida:

  • Winter: In winter, House Finches may gather in flocks of up to 50 birds. They are often seen feeding on seeds and berries in backyards, parks, and gardens.
  • Spring: In spring, House Finches begin to breed. The males sing their songs to attract mates. The females build nests in trees, shrubs, or even hanging flower baskets.
  • Summer: In summer, House Finches raise their young. The young birds fledge after about 12 days. The adults continue to sing their songs to defend their territory.
  • Fall: In fall, the House Finches’ numbers may decline as some birds migrate south. However, many House Finches remain in Florida year-round.

16. Wood thrush

wood thrush
wood thrush

Scientific name: Hylocichla mustelina

Size: The wood thrush is a medium-sized bird, measuring 19 to 21 cm (7.1 to 8.3 in) in length

How to identify: It has a pot-bellied body, a short tail, and a straight bill.The wood thrush is a brown bird with a warm cinnamon-brown crown and nape, a slightly duller olive-brown back, wings, and tail. The breast and belly are white with conspicuous large dark brown spots on the breast, sides, and flanks.

Habitat: The wood thrush is found in deciduous forests, woodlands, and gardens. It prefers areas with dense undergrowth and leaf litter.

Diet: The wood thrush is an omnivore, and its diet consists of a variety of insects, fruits, and berries. The exact composition of the diet varies depending on the season and the availability of food.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a wood thrush in Florida is typically 5 to 7 years. 

Wingspan: The wingspan of a wood thrush in Florida is typically 30 to 40 centimeters (12 to 16 inches).

Calls: The wood thrush makes a number of other calls, including:

  • A sharp “chip” call that is used for contact
  • A “bup-bup-bup” call that is used to signal mild distress
  • A “pit-pit-pit” call that is used to signal alarm

Seasons: Here is a detailed breakdown of the wood thrush’s seasonal presence in Florida:

  • Spring: Wood thrushes arrive in Florida in late March or early April. They begin singing soon after they arrive, and their song can be heard throughout the spring. Wood thrushes typically build their nests in the understory of forests and woodlands. They lay 3-4 eggs, which hatch after about 13-14 days. The young birds fledge after about 12 days.
  • Summer: Wood thrushes raise their young in the summer. The young birds are fed by both parents. After the young birds fledge, the wood thrushes continue to sing. Their song is less intense in the summer, but it can still be heard.
  • Fall: Wood thrushes begin to migrate in the fall. They typically leave Florida in late September or early October. Their song becomes less frequent in the fall, and it eventually stops altogether.
  • Winter: Wood thrushes winter in Central America and southern Mexico. They return to Florida in the spring.

17. White-throated Sparrow

white throated sparrow
white throated sparrow

Scientific name: Zonotrichia albicollis

Size: The white-throated sparrow is about 6 to 7 inches long. 

How to identify: The white-throated sparrow has a brown back, white throat, and black bib. The female is slightly duller than the male, and she has a brown throat instead of a white throat. The white-throated sparrow has a distinctive head pattern, with black and white stripes on the crown and a yellow spot between the eye and the bill.

Habitat: The white-throated sparrow can be found in a variety of habitats, including forests, fields, and gardens. It is a common winter bird in Florida.

Diet:  The white-throated sparrow is an omnivore, and its diet consists of a variety of seeds, insects, and berries. In Florida, their diet consists of:

  • Seeds: White-throated sparrows eat a variety of seeds, including weed seeds, grass seeds, and grain seeds. They are especially fond of millet and sunflower seeds.
  • Insects: White-throated sparrows also eat a variety of insects, including beetles, ants, wasps, caterpillars, and spiders. They are especially fond of insects that are found on the ground, such as ants and beetles.
  • Berries: White-throated sparrows also eat a variety of berries, including winterberries, bayberries, and holly berries. They are especially fond of berries that are found in winter, when other food sources are scarce.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a white-throated sparrow in Florida is typically 5 to 7 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a white-throated sparrow in Florida is typically 7.9 to 9.1 inches.

Calls: The white-throated sparrow has a number of other calls, including:

  • Chip: A short, sharp call that is used to contact other birds.
  • Tseep: A high-pitched call that is used to alarm other birds.
  • Drinking call: A series of low-pitched whistles that is used to attract mates.

Seasons:
The white-throated sparrow is a migratory bird, and it breeds in Canada and the northeastern United States. In Florida, white-throated sparrows are only seen during the winter months, from November to March.

18. Brown thrasher 

brown thrasher
brown thrasher

Scientific name: Toxostoma rufum

Size: The brown thrasher is a fairly large bird, about the size of a robin. It measures 23.5 to 30.5 cm (9.3 to 12.0 in) long. 

How to identify: The upperparts of the brown thrasher are brown, and the underparts are white with dark streaks. The head is gray with a blackish eyestripe.  It has a long, slightly downcurved bill and a long tail.

Habitat: Brown thrashers are found in a variety of habitats in Florida, including:

  • Woodland edges: Brown thrashers are often found near the edges of forests, where there is a mix of trees and shrubs.
  • Thickets: Brown thrashers also like to live in thickets, where they can find cover from predators.
  • Hedgerows: Brown thrashers can also be found in hedgerows, which are rows of shrubs that are planted along roadsides or property borders.
  • Open areas: Brown thrashers can sometimes be found in open areas, such as fields or lawns, but they prefer to have some cover nearby.

Diet: Brown thrashers are omnivorous birds, meaning they eat both plants and animals. Their diet consists of a variety of insects, fruits, berries, and small mammals.

  • Insects: Insects make up the majority of the brown thrasher’s diet. They eat a variety of insects, including beetles, grasshoppers, caterpillars, cicadas, and ants. They also eat spiders, snails, and earthworms.
  • Fruits and berries: Brown thrashers also eat a variety of fruits and berries, including mulberries, blackberries, blueberries, and raspberries. They also eat the fruits of some trees, such as dogwood and holly.
  • Small mammals: Brown thrashers will occasionally eat small mammals, such as mice and voles. They will also eat the eggs of birds and reptiles.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a brown thrasher in Florida is typically 5-7 years. 

Wingspan: The wingspan of a brown thrasher in Florida is typically 11.4-12.6 inches (29-32 cm).

Calls:
Brown thrashers have a variety of calls, including:

  • Song: The brown thrasher’s song is a long, drawn-out trill that can last for several minutes. It is often described as sounding like “plant a seed, plant a seed, bury it, bury it, cover it up, cover it up, let it grow, let it grow, pull it up, pull it up, eat it, eat it.”
  • Alarm call: The brown thrasher’s alarm call is a sharp “chick-a-dee” sound. It is often used to warn other birds of danger.
  • Contact call: The brown thrasher’s contact call is a soft “churr” sound. It is used to keep in touch with other birds.
  • Mating call: The brown thrasher’s mating call is a series of harsh, slurred whistles. It is used to attract mates.

Seasons: Here are details about the breeding seasons of brown thrashers in Florida:

  • Nesting: Brown thrashers typically build their nests on the ground, in thickets or under shrubs. The nest is made of twigs, leaves, and grass, and is lined with soft materials, such as hair or feathers.
  • Eggs: Brown thrashers lay 3-5 eggs, which are incubated by the female for about 12 days. The young birds fledge from the nest after about 12-14 days.
  • Migration: Brown thrashers are not migratory birds, but some individuals may move to different parts of Florida during the winter.

19. Brown Creeper

brown creeper
brown creeper

Scientific name: Certhia americana.

Size: The brown creeper is a small bird, measuring about 4.7-5.5 inches (12-14 cm) in length. 

How to identify: They have a long, thin bill that is slightly downcurved. Their back is brown and their belly is white. They have a blackish head with a broad, buffy stripe over the eye.

Habitat: Brown creepers are found in a variety of habitats, including:

  • Deciduous forests: Brown creepers are often seen in deciduous forests, especially during the winter months. They prefer forests with large, mature trees that have loose bark.
  • Coniferous forests: Brown creepers can also be found in coniferous forests, especially during the breeding season. They prefer forests with a mix of evergreen and deciduous trees.
  • Urban areas: Brown creepers are sometimes seen in urban areas, especially in parks and gardens with large trees.

Diet: Brown creepers are insectivores, meaning that they eat insects. They have a long, thin bill that is perfect for probing into crevices and picking at loose bark for insects. Their diet consists of a variety of insects, including:

  • Scale insects: These are small insects that live on the bark of trees.
  • Aphids: These are small, soft-bodied insects that suck the sap from plants.
  • Caterpillars: These are the larval stage of moths and butterflies.
  • Spiders: These are eight-legged arachnids that are found in a variety of habitats.
  • Other insects: Brown creepers will also eat other insects, such as beetles, flies, and ants.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a brown creeper in Florida is typically around 4-5 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a brown creeper in Florida is typically around 6.7-7.9 inches (17-20 cm).

Calls: Brown creepers have a high-pitched, piercing call that sounds like “tseep.” They also make a series of short, sharp calls that sound like “tsee, tsee, tsee.”

Seasons:

Brown creepers are permanent residents in Florida, meaning they can be seen in the state year-round. However, they are more common in the winter months, when they migrate from colder parts of the country.

20. Eastern Phoebe

eastern phoebe
eastern phoebe

Scientific name: Sayornis phoebe.

Size: The Eastern Phoebe is a small bird, measuring 5.5-6.7 inches (14-17 cm) in length. 

How to identify: The Eastern Phoebe is a brown and white bird with a grayish-olive back and tail. The head is slightly darker than the rest of the body, and the underparts are white with a cinnamon wash.

Habitat: Here are some of the specific habitats where you can find Eastern Phoebes in Florida:

  • Streamsides: Eastern Phoebes are often found near water, and they are frequently seen perched on rocks or logs along streams.
  • Farms: Eastern Phoebes are also common on farms, and they can often be seen perched on fenceposts or in trees near barns or other farm buildings.
  • Woodlands: Eastern Phoebes can also be found in woodlands, and they are often seen perched in trees or on the ground near streams or ponds.
  • Urban areas: Eastern Phoebes are even found in urban areas, and they can often be seen perched on bridges, buildings, or other human-made structures.

Diet: The Eastern Phoebe is an insectivore, and its diet consists primarily of flying insects, such as flies, mosquitoes, wasps, and bees. It will also eat spiders, caterpillars, and other small insects.

Lifespan: The lifespan of an Eastern Phoebe in Florida is typically 4-6 years. 

Wingspan: The wingspan of an Eastern Phoebe, a brown bird in Florida, is typically 10.2-11.0 inches (26-28 cm).

Calls: Here is a breakdown of the different calls of the Eastern Phoebe:

  • Song: The song of the Eastern Phoebe is a two-parted raspy “fee-bee.” The second syllable is often higher or lower than the first, and the song is repeated many times.
  • Chip note: The chip note is a soft, high-pitched call that the Eastern Phoebe uses to communicate with other birds. It is often used as a contact call or to attract attention.
  • Chattering call: The chattering call is a nasal, chattering sound that the Eastern Phoebe gives when hovering at a possible nest site. It is thought to be used to attract a mate or to show the site to a female.

Seasons: Here is a detailed breakdown of the Eastern Phoebe’s seasons in Florida:

  • Spring: Eastern Phoebes start arriving in Florida in mid- to late March. They typically build their nests in this season, which are made of mud and grass and are often placed under bridges, eaves, or other sheltered areas. The female lays 4-6 eggs, which hatch after about 16 days. The young birds fledge after about 18 days.
  • Summer: Eastern Phoebes spend the summer raising their young and feeding on insects. They are a common sight in backyards and parks during this time.
  • Fall: Eastern Phoebes start leaving Florida in September or early October. They typically migrate to the southeastern United States, Mexico, and Central America for the winter.

21. Northern Waterthrush

northern waterthrush
northern waterthrush

Scientific name: Parkesia noveboracensis

Size: The Northern Waterthrush is a small bird, measuring about 4.7 to 5.5 inches (12 to 14 cm) in length. 

How to identify: Northern Waterthrushes are brown above and white below, with dark streaks on their underparts. They have a pale eyebrow stripe that is often buffy in color. The legs of Northern Waterthrushes are dusky and less pink than those of Louisiana Waterthrushes.

Habitat: Northern Waterthrushes are found near water, such as streams, rivers, and lakes. They are often seen wading in shallow water, looking for insects and other small creatures to eat.

Diet: The Northern Waterthrush is an insectivore, meaning that it eats insects. Its diet consists of a variety of aquatic and terrestrial insects, including:

  • Water beetles
  • Water bugs
  • Flea beetles
  • Damselflies
  • Weevils
  • Mosquitoes
  • Ants
  • Fly pupae
  • Caterpillars
  • Moths
  • Slugs
  • Snails
  • Small fish

Lifespan: The lifespan of a Northern Waterthrush in Florida is typically around 5 years. 

Wingspan: The wingspan of a Northern Waterthrush in Florida is typically around 8.9-10.0 inches (22.5-25.5 cm).

Calls: The Northern Waterthrush has a variety of calls, including:

  • Song: The song of the Northern Waterthrush is a series of high-pitched whistles, often described as “whew, whew, whew.” The song is usually given from an elevated perch, such as a branch or a stump.
  • Call: The call of the Northern Waterthrush is a loud, sharp “chip” or “tseep.” This call is often given when the bird is alarmed or when it is trying to attract the attention of other birds.
  • Nestling calls: Nestling Northern Waterthrushes make a high-pitched begging call when they are hungry. This call is often given in unison by all of the nestlings in a brood.

Seasons: Northern Waterthrushes are migratory birds, which means they travel long distances between their breeding and wintering grounds. In Florida, Northern Waterthrushes can be seen during the spring and fall migration, as well as during the winter.

  • Spring: Northern Waterthrushes begin arriving in Florida in late March or early April. They breed in the northern United States and Canada, and they travel to Florida to take advantage of the warmer climate during the breeding season.
  • Summer: Northern Waterthrushes are most common in Florida during the summer. They build their nests in moist areas, such as swamps, bogs, and marshes. The female lays 3-5 eggs, and the young hatch after about 12 days.
  • Fall: Northern Waterthrushes begin leaving Florida in late August or early September. They travel to their wintering grounds in Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean.

22. American Robin

american robin
american robin

Scientific name: Turdus migratorius

Size: The Florida scrub-robin is about the same size as the typical American Robin, measuring 23 to 28 cm (9.1 to 11.0 in) long. 

How to identify:  The breast of the Florida scrub-robin is a mottled brown color, unlike the typical red breast of the American Robin. The head of the Florida scrub-robin is grayish-brown, and it has a black eye stripe. it has a more slender build.

Habitat: The Florida scrub-robin is found in the scrub and pinelands of Florida. It is a state-endangered species, and its population is declining due to habitat loss.

Diet: Their diet consists of a combination of insects, earthworms, fruits, and berries.

During the breeding season, American Robins primarily feed on earthworms and insects, such as beetles, caterpillars, grasshoppers, and spiders. They use their sharp eyesight to locate and capture these small creatures on the ground.

In addition to insects, American Robins also consume various fruits and berries. They have a particular fondness for berries from trees and shrubs such as holly, juniper, dogwood, and sumac. They may also eat cultivated fruits like cherries and strawberries when available.

Lifespan: The average lifespan of an American Robin (Turdus migratorius) is typically around 2 to 6 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of an American Robin (Turdus migratorius) typically ranges between 12 to 16 inches (30 to 40 centimeters).

Calls: American Robins also produce a variety of other vocalizations. Here are some common calls you may hear from an American Robin in Florida:

  • Alarm Call: When alarmed or threatened, American Robins emit a sharp “tut” or “tuk” sound. This call is used to alert nearby robins and other birds of potential danger.
  • Chatter: American Robins may produce a rapid series of high-pitched, metallic-sounding calls when they are in close proximity to one another or during territorial disputes. It can sound like a series of short, raspy “tic” or “tack” notes.
  • Contact Call: When American Robins are in a group, they use soft, warbling calls to maintain contact with each other. These calls can be described as a soft “tseeep” or “whit-whit” sound.
  • Nest Alarm Call: When a predator or threat approaches their nest, American Robins may emit a harsh, scolding call to warn off the intruder. It is a rapid, repetitive “cheek” or “squeak” sound.

Seasons: 

  • Winter (December to February): During the winter months, American Robins in Florida may exhibit a behavior known as “wintering.” Some individuals from northern regions migrate to Florida seeking milder climates and abundant food sources. They can be observed feeding on fruits, berries, and occasionally insects. They may form flocks and forage in open areas, including parks, gardens, and wooded areas.
  • Spring (March to May): Spring is an important season for American Robins as they begin their breeding activities. In Florida, this coincides with the arrival of many migratory birds. Male robins establish territories by singing their melodious songs and engaging in courtship displays. They build nests in trees, shrubs, or on man-made structures and lay their eggs. During this time, they actively forage for insects and worms to feed their young.
  • Summer (June to August): American Robins continue to raise their chicks during the summer months. They are more focused on feeding their offspring, often searching for insects and other invertebrates. Their diet may shift slightly to include more protein-rich foods. They can be seen hopping and running on lawns or other open areas, searching for food.
  • Fall (September to November): In the fall, some American Robins in Florida may start to exhibit migratory behavior, especially if they originated from northern regions. They join flocks and prepare for their journey back to their breeding grounds. However, many resident robins may remain in Florida throughout the year, especially in areas with ample food sources.

23. Brown Pelican

brown pelican
brown pelican

Scientific name: Pelecanus occidentalis.

Size: On average, adult Brown Pelicans have a length ranging from 106 to 137 centimeters (42 to 54 inches). 

How to identify: 

  • Shape: Brown Pelicans are large birds with a long neck and a long, straight beak. They have a stocky body and short legs. Their wings are long and broad, extending beyond the tail when folded.
  • Plumage: Adult Brown Pelicans have a dark brown body with a lighter brown or grayish head and neck. During breeding season, they develop a reddish-brown patch on their neck and a yellow crown. Their underparts are usually white or pale gray.

Habitat: 

  • Estuaries: Brown Pelicans can be found in estuarine areas where rivers meet the sea. Estuaries provide a mix of freshwater and saltwater habitats, offering ample food sources for the pelicans.
  • Bays: They can be seen in sheltered bays, which provide calm waters and abundant fish populations. Brown Pelicans are often observed perched on pilings or rocks near bay areas.
  • Mangroves: Mangrove forests along the coast are another favored habitat of Brown Pelicans. These unique ecosystems with their tangled roots offer nesting sites and protection for the birds.
  • Barrier Islands: Brown Pelicans are known to frequent barrier islands, which provide sandy beaches and dunes for nesting. These islands often have a diverse range of fish species, making them ideal hunting grounds.
  • Coastal Wetlands: Coastal wetlands, such as marshes and lagoons, also attract Brown Pelicans. These areas offer a rich variety of fish, crustaceans, and other aquatic life that serve as their primary food source.

Diet: 

  • Menhaden: These small, oily fish are a staple in the diet of Brown Pelicans. They are often found in large schools and provide an abundant food source.
  • Mullet: Brown Pelicans also prey on mullet, which are medium-sized fish known for their jumping ability. Mullet are commonly found in coastal waters and estuaries.
  • Flounder: Brown Pelicans may also feed on flounder, which are flatfish found in shallow coastal waters. They use their sharp beaks to catch these bottom-dwelling fish.
  • Snook: Snook, a popular game fish in Florida, are another prey item for Brown Pelicans. They are often found near mangroves and inshore areas.
  • Sardines: Schools of sardines can be an important food source for Brown Pelicans, especially during certain times of the year when these fish are abundant.

Lifespan: On average, Brown Pelicans in the wild typically live for about 10 to 15 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of the Brown Pelican, a brown bird found in Florida, typically ranges from 180 to 215 centimeters (71 to 85 inches).

Calls: The Brown Pelican, a brown bird found in Florida, produces a variety of vocalizations. Here are some of the common calls made by Brown Pelicans:

  • Squawks: Brown Pelicans often emit loud, squawking calls that sound like “ark-ark-ark” or “kraak-kraak-kraak.” These calls are used for communication within the colony or to alert nearby birds of potential threats or disturbances.
  • Grunts: Brown Pelicans may also produce low, grunting sounds, especially during interactions with other individuals. These grunts are often short and deep, resembling a guttural “grrr” or “uhh” sound.
  • Bill Clapping: When engaged in courtship or territorial displays, Brown Pelicans may perform bill clapping, where they rapidly clap their bills together. This produces a distinctive sound that can be described as a series of sharp, rapid clicks.
  • Chattering: Brown Pelicans sometimes engage in chattering vocalizations, characterized by a rapid succession of short, high-pitched notes. This chattering can occur during interactions within the colony or during flight.
  • Guttural Growls: During aggressive encounters or disputes over territory or food, Brown Pelicans may emit guttural growls. These growls are deep and harsh, often expressing dominance or territorial defense.

Seasons: 

  • Breeding Season (Spring and Summer): Brown Pelicans in Florida typically engage in breeding activities during the spring and summer months. Breeding colonies can be found on coastal islands, barrier islands, and other suitable nesting sites. During this time, the adult pelicans develop breeding plumage, including a reddish-brown patch on their neck and a yellow crown.
  • Migration: While some Brown Pelicans in Florida are non-migratory, others may undertake short-distance or local movements in search of food or more favorable breeding locations. These movements can occur throughout the year and are not necessarily tied to specific seasons.
  • Winter: During the winter months, Brown Pelicans in Florida may experience fluctuations in their population size and behavior. Some individuals from more northern regions may migrate south to Florida during the winter in search of milder temperatures and ample food sources.

24. Carolina wren 

carolina wren
carolina wren

Scientific name: Thryothorus ludovicianus.

Size: The Carolina Wren, a brown bird found in Florida, typically measures about 4.9 to 5.5 inches (12.5 to 14 cm) in length.

How to identify: 

  • Size and Shape: Carolina Wrens are small birds with a stocky build. They have a round body, a long tail that is often held upright, and a slightly curved bill.
  • Coloration: Carolina Wrens have rich brown plumage on their upperparts, with reddish-brown shades on the wings and tail. Their underparts are light buff or pale brown, often with faint barring on the sides and belly.
  • Head and Face: The head of a Carolina Wren is large in proportion to its body, with a distinctive white or pale eyebrow stripe (supercilium) above the eye. They have a dark cap on the top of their head, which may appear slightly crested.
  • Tail: The Carolina Wren’s tail is often cocked or raised, and it has prominent black bars or barring patterns on the underside.

Habitat: Some common habitats where you can find Carolina Wrens in Florida include:

  • Forests: They can be found in both deciduous and mixed forests, often near the edges or in dense understory vegetation. Carolina Wrens prefer areas with thick vegetation, fallen logs, and brush piles.
  • Woodlands: They can also be found in woodlands, including pine forests, oak-hickory woodlands, and scrubby areas with shrubs and low vegetation.
  • Suburban Areas: Carolina Wrens readily adapt to suburban environments, such as residential neighborhoods, parks, and gardens with shrubs, trees, and dense vegetation.
  • Swamps and Wetlands: They can be found in swampy areas, cypress swamps, and wetlands with dense vegetation and water sources.
  • Riparian Zones: Carolina Wrens are often found near streams, rivers, and other bodies of water, particularly in areas with thick vegetation along the banks.

Diet: The diet of the Carolina Wren, a brown bird found in Florida, primarily consists of insects and other small invertebrates. They are known to be opportunistic foragers and will search for food in various locations, including on the ground, in shrubs, and among leaf litter. Some common food items in the Carolina Wren’s diet include:

  • Insects: They feed on a wide variety of insects, including beetles, caterpillars, grasshoppers, spiders, and ants.
  • Moths and Butterflies: Carolina Wrens will actively hunt and capture moths and butterflies, particularly during the summer months when these insects are abundant.
  • Small Arthropods: They also consume small arthropods like millipedes, centipedes, and sowbugs.
  • Spiders: Carolina Wrens have a fondness for spiders and will feed on them whenever they encounter them.
  • Small Snails: In addition to insects, Carolina Wrens may occasionally eat small snails, particularly during times when other food sources are scarce.

Lifespan: The lifespan of Carolina Wrens, brown birds found in Florida, can vary, but on average, they live for about 6 to 7 years in the wild.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a Carolina Wren, a brown bird found in Florida, typically ranges from 11 to 12 inches (28 to 30 cm).

Calls: Here are some of the common calls and songs of the Carolina Wren:

  • Song: The Carolina Wren’s song is a loud, rich, and complex series of musical notes. It is often described as a loud, ringing song that resembles a tea-kettle whistle. The song is typically delivered in a rapid and energetic manner, with a variety of trills, whistles, and musical phrases.
  • Chatter: Carolina Wrens also produce a rapid and chattering call, which is a series of short and quick notes. This chatter is often heard when the bird is agitated or alarmed.
  • Alarm Call: When alarmed or disturbed, Carolina Wrens emit a sharp and loud “chit” or “churr” sound. This call serves as an alert to other individuals in the area.
  • Scolding Call: When defending their territory or in response to intruders, Carolina Wrens may emit a harsh scolding call, which is a rapid and repetitive series of short notes.

Seasons: Carolina Wrens, brown birds found in Florida, are resident birds in the state, which means they can be found there throughout the year. They do not migrate long distances like some other bird species. Instead, Carolina Wrens generally remain in their breeding territories year-round.

25. Marsh Wren

marsh wren
marsh wren

Scientific name: Cistothorus palustris

Size: The size of the Marsh Wren, a brown bird found in Florida, is typically around 4.5 to 5 inches (11 to 13 centimeters) in length.

How to identify: 

  • Coloration: They have brown upperparts with darker streaks and a lighter brown or buff-colored underbelly. Their back and wings may appear slightly barred.
  • Head and Face: Marsh Wrens have a dark cap that extends to the sides of the head, creating a distinct “mask” effect. They have a relatively short bill.
  • Tail: They have a relatively short, dark, and often cocked tail.

Habitat: The Marsh Wren, a brown bird found in Florida, typically inhabits marshes, wetlands, and similar habitats. They are commonly found in areas with tall grasses, cattails, reeds, and other dense vegetation near water sources such as marshes, swamps, and coastal areas. These birds are well adapted to living in wetland environments and are often seen skulking and foraging among the vegetation, using it for cover and nesting.

Diet: The diet of the Marsh Wren, a brown bird found in Florida, primarily consists of small invertebrates and insects. They forage within their marsh habitat, feeding on various arthropods such as spiders, beetles, grasshoppers, flies, and caterpillars. They also consume small snails, crustaceans, and occasionally include seeds and plant matter in their diet. Marsh Wrens are skilled at probing and searching for food among the vegetation, using their slender bills to capture prey hidden in the marshy environment.

Lifespan: The lifespan of the Marsh Wren, a brown bird found in Florida, is typically around 2 to 3 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of the Marsh Wren, a brown bird found in Florida, is generally around 5 to 6 inches (12 to 15 centimeters).

Calls: The Marsh Wren, a brown bird found in Florida, is known for its complex and melodious song. The male Marsh Wren’s song is a distinctive and bubbling series of musical notes, often described as a gurgling or chattering sound. They produce a variety of vocalizations, including trills, rattles, and warbles. Their vocalizations serve territorial purposes and are often used to attract mates. The calls of the Marsh Wren can vary slightly between individuals, but they generally have a rich and vibrant song that is characteristic of their species.

Seasons: The Marsh Wren, a brown bird found in Florida, is generally present throughout the year in its habitat. It is considered a resident bird in Florida, meaning it does not migrate long distances. However, their breeding season typically occurs from March to July, with peak activity during the spring and early summer months. During this time, the Marsh Wrens engage in courtship displays, build nests, and raise their young. Outside of the breeding season, they continue to inhabit their marsh habitats, forage for food, and maintain territories.

Frequently asked question: brown birds in Florida

Q: What are the magnificent 25 brown birds in Florida?

A: The magnificent 25 brown birds refer to a group of avian species found in Florida that display stunning variations of brown coloration. This diverse group includes birds such as the Northern Cardinal, Reddish Egret, Brown Pelican, Great Crested Flycatcher, Brown Thrasher, and many more.

Q: Where can I find the magnificent 25 brown birds in Florida?

A: These birds can be found in various habitats throughout Florida, including wetlands, forests, coastal areas, and urban parks. Each species may have its preferred habitat, so it’s best to research their specific preferences and plan your birdwatching outings accordingly.

Q: When is the best time to observe the magnificent 25 brown birds in Florida?

A: The best time to observe these birds is typically during the early morning or late afternoon when they are most active. Different species may have different activity patterns, so it’s recommended to research their feeding and mating behaviors to determine the optimal time for observation.

Q: What equipment do I need for observing these birds?

A: To enhance your birdwatching experience, it’s recommended to have a good pair of binoculars to get a closer look at the birds. A field guide or birding app can also be helpful for identification purposes. Additionally, consider carrying a camera or smartphone to capture photos or record observations.

Q: How can I identify the magnificent 25 brown birds?

A: Identifying these birds requires careful observation of their distinct features and behaviors. It’s beneficial to study field guides or consult birding apps that provide detailed descriptions, range maps, and photos. Pay attention to size, shape, plumage patterns, beak characteristics, and any unique markings or behaviors.

Q: Are there any specific conservation concerns for the magnificent 25 brown birds?

A: While some species within the magnificent 25 brown birds group may face specific conservation challenges, it’s essential to support overall conservation efforts to protect their habitats and biodiversity. By respecting their habitats, avoiding disturbances, and contributing to citizen science initiatives, we can help conserve these beautiful birds and their ecosystems.

Q: Can I contribute to bird conservation efforts as a birdwatcher?

A: Absolutely! As a birdwatcher, you can contribute to bird conservation efforts by participating in citizen science initiatives, such as reporting sightings to bird databases or joining bird counts. Additionally, supporting local conservation organizations and advocating for the protection of natural habitats can make a significant impact.

Q: Are there any organized events or tours focused on the magnificent 25 brown birds in Florida?

A: Yes, there are often organized birding events, guided tours, and workshops in Florida that focus on observing and learning about the diverse avian species, including the magnificent 25 brown birds. These opportunities provide a chance to explore specific habitats, learn from experienced birders, and connect with fellow birdwatching enthusiasts.

Q: Can I attract the magnificent 25 brown birds to my backyard?

A: Creating bird-friendly habitats in your backyard can attract a variety of bird species, including some of the magnificent 25 brown birds. Providing food sources, water features, and native vegetation can encourage their presence. Research the specific dietary preferences and nesting requirements of the birds you wish to attract and create a suitable environment accordingly.

Conclusion: 

In the wondrous world of birdwatching, Florida’s magnificent 25 brown birds stand out as true gems. From the vibrant hues of the Northern Cardinal to the majestic flights of the Brown Pelican, these avian wonders captivate both seasoned birdwatchers and curious observers alike. With their diverse habitats and distinct behaviors, these birds offer an enchanting journey through Florida’s landscapes, showcasing the intricate beauty of nature.

By following the tips and best practices for observing these magnificent birds, one can embark on a fulfilling birdwatching adventure. Researching the species, visiting suitable habitats, and practicing patience and attentiveness are key to maximizing the chances of encountering and appreciating these brown beauties in their natural habitats. Using appropriate equipment, respecting their environment, and participating in birding communities further enrich the experience.

The conservation of these birds and their habitats is of utmost importance. By responsibly documenting sightings, contributing to citizen science initiatives, and supporting conservation efforts, birdwatchers can play an active role in protecting the magnificent 25 brown birds and the ecosystems they rely on.

Florida’s magnificent 25 brown birds are a testament to the awe-inspiring diversity of nature. They remind us to look up, observe, and appreciate the wonders that surround us. So, grab your binoculars, immerse yourself in the natural splendor of Florida, and embark on an unforgettable journey to witness the magnificence of these brown-feathered marvels.

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