5 AMAZING BEAUTIFUL DOVES IN HAWAII

Welcome to the enchanting world of Hawaii, where breathtaking landscapes meet vibrant wildlife. Among the plethora of captivating creatures that grace these tropical islands, these 5 amazing beautiful doves in Hawaii stand out as true avian treasures. With their striking plumage and melodious songs, these feathered gems add a touch of elegance and serenity to the island paradise. 

In this journey of discovery, we invite you to join us as we unveil 5 amazing beautiful doves in Hawaii that call Hawaii home. Prepare to be mesmerized by their delicate grace, vibrant colours, and the ethereal melodies that fill the air. Get ready to immerse yourself in the captivating realm of these stunning doves, where natural beauty and avian wonder collide. Let us embark on this avian adventure and explore the dazzling world of Hawaii’s magnificent doves together!

Here are Best practices and tips to observe 5 amazing beautiful doves in Hawaii: 

  • Research and familiarize yourself: Learn about the specific habitats, behaviours, and preferred locations of each dove species. This knowledge will guide you to the right areas and increase your chances of spotting them.
  • Timing is key: Doves are often most active during the early morning or late afternoon when they are foraging or engaging in courtship displays. Plan your observations during these times for optimal sightings.
  • Choose suitable habitats: Each dove species has its preferred habitat. The Indian Ring Dove, for example, thrives in urban areas, while the Emerald Dove prefers dense forests. Identify the specific habitats suitable for each species and explore those areas.
  • Be patient and observant: Patience is a virtue when it comes to bird watching. Spend ample time in quiet observation, listening for their distinctive calls and looking for movement among the foliage. Doves may camouflage well, so a keen eye is essential.
  • Stay quiet and minimize disturbances: Doves can be easily startled, so maintain a quiet demeanour and avoid sudden movements or loud noises that could scare them away. Respect their space and observe from a distance to minimize disturbance.
  • Use binoculars or a camera with a zoom lens: Doves can perch high up in trees or in distant locations, making it challenging to observe them closely. Binoculars or a camera with a zoom lens will help you get a better view and appreciate their intricate details.
  • Learn their calls and songs: Each dove species has its unique vocalizations. Familiarize yourself with their calls and songs through recordings or online resources. This knowledge will assist you in identifying their presence even if they are hidden from view.
  • Join local birding communities or guided tours: Connecting with experienced birdwatchers or participating in guided tours can provide valuable insights, increase your knowledge, and heighten your chances of spotting these doves. They can share their expertise and take you to prime birding locations.
  • Respect and protect their habitats: While observing these doves, prioritize their well-being and the preservation of their natural habitats. Follow ethical bird watching practices and adhere to guidelines for protecting the environment.
  • Keep a field guide or birding app handy: Carrying a field guide or using a birding app on your smartphone can be immensely helpful in identifying dove species and learning more about their behaviours, habitats, and distributions

List of 5 amazing beautiful doves in Hawaii:

  1. Mourning Dove
  2. Zebra Dove
  3. Spotted Dove
  4. Barred Dove
  5. Eurasian Collared Dove

1. Barred Dove

Scientific name: Zenaida aurita

Size: The barren dove in Hawaii is a small bird, measuring about 12 inches in length and weighing about 4 ounces.

How to identify: Here are some of the features that make up the appearance of the barren dove in Hawaii:

  • Body: The barren dove has a long, slender body. It is about 12 inches long and weighs about 4 ounces.
  • Head: The head of the barren dove is small and round. It has a short, pointed beak.
  • Eyes: The eyes of the barren dove are dark brown.
  • Feathers: The feathers of the barren dove are brown with black barring. The belly is white.
  • Tail: The tail of the barren dove is long and pointed. It is black with white tips.

Habitat: The barred dove inhabits a variety of habitats, including scrub, farmland, and open country in lowland areas. It is also found in urban areas and can often be seen in parks and gardens.

Diet:
The barred dove is an omnivorous bird, meaning that it eats both plant and animal matter. Its diet in Hawaii consists of the following:

  • Seeds: Barred doves eat a variety of seeds, including those of grasses, legumes, and weeds. They are especially fond of the seeds of introduced plants, such as corn, wheat, and rice.
  • Fruits: Barred doves also eat fruits, such as berries, grapes, and bananas. They are particularly fond of the fruits of introduced plants, such as guava and papaya.
  • Insects: Barred doves also eat insects, such as ants, beetles, and caterpillars. They are especially fond of insects that are found in agricultural areas, such as cornfields and rice paddies.
  • Other animals: Barred doves have also been known to eat small animals, such as snails and slugs. They will also eat carrion, if they find it.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a barred dove in Hawaii is typically 5-7 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a barred dove in Hawaii is typically 24-26 cm (9.4-10.2 in).

Calls: The barred dove’s call is a two-parted “coo-coo” sound, with the second note being slightly higher in pitch. The call is often repeated several times in a row. The barred dove also makes a soft, warbling sound when it is courting.

Seasons: The barred dove is a year-round resident in Hawaii. However, there are some seasonal changes in their behaviour.

  • Nesting season: Barred doves typically nest from March to July. During this time, they are more active and vocal. They will also build their nests on the ground, which can be seen in open areas, such as fields, meadows, and gardens.
  • Migration: Barred doves do not migrate, but they may move to different areas of the island depending on the availability of food. For example, they may move to higher elevations in the summer to escape the heat.
  • Winter: In the winter, barred doves may become more active in the morning and evening. This is because they are trying to find food before it gets too cold.

2. Mourning Dove

Scientific name: Zenaida macroura

Size: The mourning dove in Hawaii is about one foot long, or 30 centimetres.

How to identify: The mourning dove is a greyish-brown bird with black spots on its 

Wings. It has a long, pointed tail. The male and female mourning dove looks alike.

Habitat: The mourning dove is a common sight in Hawaii, and can be found in a variety of habitats, including:

  • Open areas with some trees or shrubs for cover, such as parks, gardens, and golf courses.
  • Near sources of water, such as rivers, streams, and ponds.
  • In urban areas, such as parks and gardens.
  • In agricultural areas, such as fields and orchards.

Diet: Here are some of the specific foods that mourning doves eat in Hawaii:

  • Millet: Millet is a small, round seed that is a favourite food of mourning doves. It is often used in birdseed mixes, and it can also be found growing wild in some areas.
  • Corn: Corn is another popular food for mourning doves. It is a good source of carbohydrates, and it also contains some protein.
  • Grass seeds: Grass seeds are a natural food for mourning doves. They are a good source of fiber, and they also contain some protein.
  • Insects: Mourning doves will eat some insects, particularly during the breeding season. Insects are a good source of protein, and they help to provide the nutrients that the young birds need to grow.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a mourning dove in Hawaii is typically 1-3 years. 

Wingspan: The wingspan of a mourning dove in Hawaii is typically 37-45 centimetres. 

Calls: Mourning doves are known for their distinctive cooing call. The call is a long, drawn-out sound that is often described as “oo-oo-oo.” The call is usually given by the male mourning dove, but the female may also coo.

The mourning dove call is used for a variety of purposes, including:

  • Attracting a mate: The male mourning dove will often coo to attract a mate. The call is a way for the male to show off his territory and to let the female know that he is available.
  • Declaring territory: The mourning dove call is also used to declare territory. The male mourning dove will often coo to let other male mourning doves know that he is in the area and that they should stay away.
  • Nesting: The mourning dove call is also used during the nesting season. The male and female mourning dove will often coo to each other to keep track of each other’s location.
  • Contact call: The mourning dove call can also be used as a contact call. The male and female mourning dove will often coo to each other to let each other know where they are.

Seasons: The breeding season for mourning doves in Hawaii typically runs from February to August. 

3. Zebra Dove

Scientific name: Geopelia striata

Size: The size of a zebra dove in Hawaii is about 20-23 centimetres in length.

How to identify: Here are some of the key features that can help you to identify a zebra dove in Hawaii:

  • The black and white barring on the back and neck.
  • The pinkish-brown breast.
  • The blue-grey face with bare blue skin around the eyes.
  • The soft, staccato cooing call.

Habitat: Zebra doves in Hawaii can be found in a variety of habitats, including:

  • Urban and suburban areas: Zebra doves are often seen in parks, gardens, and even on city streets. They are attracted to areas where there is a lot of food and water, such as bird feeders and gardens with fruit trees.
  • Agricultural areas: Zebra doves are also common in agricultural areas, where they feed on grain and seeds. They can often be seen perched on fence posts or wires or feeding in fields.
  • Forests: Zebra doves can occasionally be found in forests, but they are more common in open areas. They are attracted to areas with plenty of trees for nesting and perching.
  • Coastal areas: Zebra doves can also be found in coastal areas, where they feed on seeds and insects. They are often seen near beaches, where they can find food and water.

Diet: Here are some of the foods that zebra doves eat in Hawaii:

  • Seeds: Zebra doves eat a variety of seeds, including millet, corn, and rice. They will also eat seeds from weeds and grasses.
  • Insects: Zebra doves will eat a variety of insects, including flies, ants, beetles, and caterpillars. They will also eat spiders and other small invertebrates.
  • Fruit: Zebra doves will eat a variety of fruits, including bananas, papayas, and mangoes. They will also eat berries and other small fruits.
  • Snails: Zebra doves will occasionally eat snails. They will break the snail’s shell with their beak and then eat the soft body inside.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a zebra dove in Hawaii is typically 5-10 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a zebra dove in Hawaii is typically 24-26 centimetres.

Calls:
The calls of zebra doves in Hawaii are a series of soft, staccato coos. The calls are often described as sounding like “coo-coo-coo-coo-coo.” The calls are used for a variety of purposes, including communication with other doves, attracting mates, and defending their territory.

Seasons: the peak breeding season is from September to June. This is when the weather is warm and there is plenty of food available.

4. Spotted Dove

Scientific name: Spilopelia chinensis

Size: The Spotted Dove in Hawaii is a medium-sized dove, measuring about 25-30 cm in length.

How to identify: Here are some tips on how to identify a Spotted Dove in Hawaii:

  • Look for the black and white collar. This is the most distinctive feature of the Spotted Dove. The collar is made up of black feathers with white spots.
  • Notice the buff-brown body. The body of the Spotted Dove is buff-brown with a slightly darker head.
  • Check for the long, pointed tail. The tail of the Spotted Dove is long and pointed, and the tips of the feathers are white.

Habitat:  The Spotted Dove is found in a variety of habitats, including forests, gardens, and urban areas. It is a common sight in Hawaii, and can often be seen feeding on the ground or perched on trees.

Diet: The Spotted Dove in Hawaii is a seed-eater, and its diet also includes fruits, berries, and insects. Here are some of the foods that Spotted Doves eat in Hawaii:

  • Seeds: Spotted Doves eat a variety of seeds, including grains, grasses, and weeds. They often forage on the ground for seeds, but they will also eat seeds from bird feeders.
  • Fruits: Spotted Doves also eat fruits, such as berries, figs, and guavas. They will often eat fallen fruits from trees, but they will also eat fruits from bird feeders.
  • Insects: Spotted Doves will occasionally eat insects, such as termites, ants, and beetles. They will often eat insects that are found on the ground, but they will also eat insects that are found in trees.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a Spotted Dove in Hawaii is typically 5-10 years

Wingspan: The wingspan of a Spotted Dove in Hawaii is typically 40-45 cm (16-18 inches).

Calls: Here are some examples of the calls of the Spotted Dove in Hawaii:

  • Cooing call: This is the most common call of the Spotted Dove. It is a gentle, two-note call that is often described as a “whoo-hoo” sound. 
  • Display call: This call is given by males during courtship. It is a series of rapid “coo-coo” notes that are given while the male bows and spreads its tail. 
  • Alarm call: This call is given when the Spotted Dove is alarmed or feels threatened. It is a sharp, two-note call that is often described as a “caw-caw” sound. 

Seasons:

The Spotted Dove is a year-round resident in Hawaii, but they do breed more frequently in the spring and summer.

Here is a breakdown of the seasons of Spotted Doves in Hawaii:

  • Spring (March-May): This is the peak breeding season for Spotted Doves. They will build their nests and lay their eggs during this time.
  • Summer (June-August): The young Spotted Doves will fledge and become independent during this time.
  • Fall (September-November): Spotted Doves may start to migrate to other islands in search of food during this time.
  • Winter (December-February): Spotted Doves may become more nomadic during this time, but they will always return to Hawaii to breed.

5. Eurasian Collared Dove

Scientific name: Spilopelia chinensis

Size: The Eurasian Collared Dove in Hawaii is about 12 inches (30 cm) long.

How to identify: The Eurasian Collared Dove is a medium-sized dove with pale grey plumage, a distinctive black collar on the back of the neck, and a squared-off tail.

Habitat: The Eurasian Collared Dove is a common bird in Hawaii and can be found in a variety of habitats, including:

  • Urban and rural areas: The Eurasian Collared Dove is often seen in parks, gardens, and other urban areas. It is also common in agricultural areas, where it feeds on seeds and grain.
  • Forests: The Eurasian Collared Dove can also be found in forests, where it typically inhabits the edges of forests and open areas within forests.
  • Open areas: The Eurasian Collared Dove is also found in open areas, such as grasslands and fields. It is often seen foraging on the ground or in trees.

Diet:
The Eurasian Collared Dove is a seed-eater and its diet in Hawaii consists mainly of:

  • Grain: The Eurasian Collared Dove feeds on a variety of grains, including corn, wheat, and rice. It often forages in agricultural areas where these grains are grown.
  • Seeds: The Eurasian Collared Dove also eats the seeds of native plants, such as ohia, kukui, and milo. It can also be seen eating the seeds of weeds and other plants.
  • Insects: The Eurasian Collared Dove will also eat insects, especially when grain is scarce. It has been known to eat caterpillars, beetles, and other insects.
  • Fruit: The Eurasian Collared Dove will occasionally eat fruit, especially when it is ripe and falls to the ground. It has been known to eat the fruit of ohia, guava, and banana.

Lifespan: The lifespan of the Eurasian Collared Dove in Hawaii is typically around 5-7 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of the Eurasian Collared Dove in Hawaii is typically around 18 inches (46 cm).

Calls: The Eurasian Collared Dove in Hawaii has a soft, cooing call that is often described as sounding like “coo-coo-coo-coo.” The call is typically given in a series of 5-10 notes, and it can be heard throughout the day.

Frequently asked question on 5 amazing beautiful doves in Hawaii: 

Q: What are the five most beautiful doves found in Hawaii?

A: The five most stunning doves found in Hawaii are the Hawaiian Dove, the Zebra Dove, the White-collared Seedeater, the Diamond Dove, and the Rose-crowned Fruit Dove.

Q: Are these doves native to Hawaii or were they introduced to the islands?

A: While the Hawaiian Dove and the Rose-crowned Fruit Dove are native to Hawaii, the Zebra Dove, the White-collared Seedeater, and the Diamond Dove were introduced to the islands.

Q: What distinguishes these doves from other bird species in Hawaii?

A: These doves captivate with their vibrant plumage and unique characteristics. Each species possesses distinct colour patterns, beak shapes, and physical features that set them apart from other bird species in Hawaii.

Q: Do these doves have any special significance or cultural symbolism in Hawaiian folklore?

A: Yes, these doves hold cultural significance in Hawaiian folklore and traditions. They are often associated with beauty, peace, and the spirit of aloha, symbolizing harmony and tranquillity.

Q: Where can one spot these magnificent doves in Hawaii? Are there any specific locations or habitats they prefer?

A: These doves can be found throughout various habitats in Hawaii, including forests, parks, garden and urban areas. 

Q: What are the unique characteristics and physical features of each dove species?

A: The Hawaiian Dove features a beautiful blend of grey, pink, and white feathers. The Zebra Dove showcases a distinct pattern of black and white stripes on its chest. The White-collared Seedeater displays a striking black collar around its neck. The Diamond Dove exhibits a unique combination of white, grey, and brown hues, while the Rose-crowned Fruit Dove boasts vibrant green feathers and a rose-colour crown.

Q: Do these doves have distinct vocalizations or songs? Can you describe their melodies?

A: Yes, each dove species has its own vocalizations and songs. The Hawaiian Dove produces soft cooing sounds, while the Zebra Dove sings a distinctive “coo-coo-coo” melody. The White-collared Seedeater utters a series of short, high-pitched chirps, and the Diamond Dove emits a gentle cooing sound. The Rose-crowned Fruit Dove enchants with its melodious cooing that rises and falls in a delightful pattern.

Q: Are these doves endangered or threatened species in Hawaii?

A: The Hawaiian Dove and the Rose-crowned Fruit Dove are not considered endangered or threatened. However, the White-collared Seedeater is listed as an endangered species in Hawaii due to habitat loss and predation. The Zebra Dove and the Diamond Dove are not native to Hawaii and are not classified as endangered or threatened.

Q: Do these doves migrate or are they year-round residents of the islands?

A: The Hawaiian Dove and the Rose-crowned Fruit Dove are year-round residents of the islands and do not migrate. However, the Zebra Dove, the White-collared Seedeater, and the Diamond Dove are also non-migratory but have established populations in Hawaii after being introduced to the islands.

Q: Are there any conservation efforts in place to protect and preserve these beautiful doves in Hawaii?

A: Yes, conservation efforts are in place to protect these beautiful doves in Hawaii. These initiatives include habitat restoration, predator control, and raising awareness about the importance of preserving native bird species. Organizations such as the Hawaii Audubon Society and the Department of Land and Natural Resources work tirelessly to safeguard these doves and their habitats.

Conclusion: 

The 5 amazing and beautiful doves of Hawaii bring a touch of elegance and wonder to the tropical paradise. From the native Hawaiian Dove and Rose-crowned Fruit Dove to the introduced Zebra Dove, White-collared Seedeater, and Diamond Dove, each species possesses its own unique charm and captivating features. Their vibrant plumage, melodious songs, and cultural significance make them true avian treasures of the islands.

Whether you spot these doves in lush forests, serene parks, or even your own backyard, their presence adds a sense of tranquillity and natural beauty to the Hawaiian landscape. Their distinct vocalizations and songs fill the air with soothing melodies, captivating both bird enthusiasts and nature lovers alike.

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