green birds in Tampa Florida

7 beautiful green birds in Tampa Florida 

Welcome to the vibrant and enchanting world of green avian wonders in Tampa, Florida! Nestled amidst lush landscapes and brimming with biodiversity, this coastal gem is home to a kaleidoscope of winged treasures. Amongst the rich tapestry of colourful feathered beings, there is a special subset that captures our attention with their magnificent emerald plumage. 

Join us on a captivating journey as we explore the stunning beauty of seven beautiful green birds in Tampa Florida that grace the skies and treetops of Tampa, adding a splash of emerald to its already picturesque landscape. From the elegant emerald toucanet to the nimble parrotlet, each of these avian gems possesses its own unique charm, captivating both bird enthusiasts and casual observers alike. So, let’s spread our wings and embark on this breath-taking adventure, where nature’s palette is adorned with dazzling shades of green, revealing the true marvels of Tampa’s feathered residents. 

Observing the mesmerizing 7 beautiful green birds in Tampa, Florida can be an exhilarating and rewarding experience. To make the most of your bird watching adventure and ensure a successful encounter with these magnificent creatures, here are some best practices and tips to follow:

  • Research and Identify: Before setting out, familiarize yourself with the specific green bird species you hope to observe. Learn about their distinctive features, habitats, and behaviours. This knowledge will enhance your ability to spot and identify them accurately.
  • Choose the Right Time: Birds are most active during the early morning hours and late afternoon. Plan your bird watching trips accordingly to increase your chances of encountering these vibrant green beauties in their natural habitat.
  • Select Suitable Locations: Tampa boasts several fantastic birding hotspots, such as Lettuce Lake Park, Honeymoon Island State Park, and the Circle B Bar Reserve. Research these locations and identify the ones known for hosting green bird species. Check local birding forums and websites for recent sightings and recommendations from fellow birdwatchers.
  • Equip Yourself: Invest in a pair of binoculars to observe birds from a distance without disturbing their natural behaviour. A field guide or bird identification app can assist you in accurately identifying the green birds you come across. Additionally, consider carrying a camera to capture the awe-inspiring moments.
  • Be Patient and Quiet: Green birds, like most avian species, can be elusive and easily startled. Practice patience and move quietly to avoid scaring them away. Spend time in one area, allowing the birds to become accustomed to your presence, increasing the chances of observing their unique behaviours.
  • Dress Appropriately: Wear comfortable and weather-appropriate clothing that blends well with the surroundings. Opt for muted colours that won’t draw unnecessary attention or alarm the birds.
  • Respect their Habitat: While observing green birds, be mindful of their natural habitat and minimize any disruption. Avoid disturbing nesting sites or causing harm to the environment. Leave no trace and adhere to park rules and regulations.
  • Learn their Calls: Green birds often communicate through melodious calls. Familiarize yourself with their distinctive vocalizations to help locate and identify them, even when they are hidden from view.
  • Join Birding Groups or Tours: Consider joining local birding groups or guided bird watching tours. Experienced birders can offer valuable insights, help you locate specific species, and provide an educational and enjoyable experience.
  • Enjoy the Moment: Bird watching is a leisurely activity that allows you to appreciate the beauty of nature. Take the time to soak in the sights and sounds, and revel in the joy of observing these exquisite green birds in their natural habitat.

Remember, observing green birds in Tampa, Florida is not only a chance to witness nature’s splendour but also an opportunity to contribute to their conservation. By practicing responsible bird watching, we can ensure the preservation and protection of these enchanting creatures for generations to come.

List of 7 beautiful green birds in Tampa Florida:

  1. Budgerigar
  2. Northern Parula
  3. Painted Bunting
  4. Nanday Parakeet
  5. Green Heron
  6. Monk Parakeet:
  7. Green-winged teal

1. Budgerigar

Budgerigar
Budgerigar

Scientific name: Melopsittacus undulates

Size: The size of a budgerigar, or common parakeet, in Florida is typically 18 cm (7 in) long from head to tail. 

How to identify: 

  • Color: Budgies come in a variety of colors, but the most common colour in Florida is green. They have a bright green body with black scalloped markings on the nape, back, and wings.
  • Beak: Budgies have a small, black beak. The cere, which is the fleshy covering above the beak, is typically blue in males and brown in females.
  • Tail: Budgies have a long, pointed tail.

Habitat: Here are some of the specific habitats where you might find budgerigars in Florida:

  • Scrublands: Scrublands are areas of land with low-growing vegetation, such as shrubs, bushes, and grasses. They are often found in dry, sandy areas.
  • Open woodlands: Open woodlands are areas of land with trees that are spaced apart. They are often found in areas that have been cleared for agriculture or development.
  • Grassy woodlands: Grassy woodlands are areas of land with a mix of trees and grasses. They are often found in areas that have been disturbed by fire or flooding.
  • Farmland: Budgerigars are often found near farmland, where they can find food and water. They are also attracted to the seeds that are planted in fields.

Diet: Budgerigars, or common parakeets, are omnivorous birds. This means that they eat both plants and animals. Their diet in the wild consists of a variety of seeds, fruits, vegetables, insects, and even small animals.

Some of the most common foods that budgerigars eat in the wild include:

  • Seeds: Budgerigars are seed-eaters, and their diet in the wild consists of a variety of seeds, including millet, grass seeds, and sunflower seeds.
  • Fruits: Budgerigars also eat fruits, such as bananas, apples, berries, and melons.
  • Vegetables: Budgerigars will also eat vegetables, such as lettuce, carrots, and peas.
  • Insects: Budgerigars will eat insects, such as crickets, mealworms, and spiders.
  • Small animals: Budgerigars will also eat small animals, such as snails and slugs.

In captivity, budgerigars are typically fed a diet of commercial budgie food. This food is a mixture of see

Lifespan: The lifespan of a budgerigar, or common parakeet, in Florida is typically 5 to 10 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a budgerigar, or common parakeet, in Florida is typically 10 to 12 inches.

Calls: Budgerigars, or common parakeets, are known for their chirping and whistling sounds. They can also learn to talk.

Here are some of the most common calls that budgerigars make:

  • Chirps: Chirps are the most common sound that budgerigars make. They are used to communicate with other budgerigars and to express a variety of emotions, such as happiness, excitement, and anger.
  • Whistles: Budgerigars can also whistle a variety of tunes. They may whistle to attract mates, to communicate with other budgerigars, or simply to express their joy.
  • Squawks: Budgies may also squawk, which is a louder sound that is often used to warn of danger.

Seasons: Here are some of the things that you can expect to see budgerigars doing in different seasons in Florida:

  • Spring: Budgerigars will be building nests and laying eggs. They will also be more active and vocal.
  • Summer: Budgerigars will be raising their young. They will also be molting, which is when they shed their old feathers and grow new ones.
  • Fall: Budgerigars will be preparing for migration. They will start to gather in flocks and may start to travel south.
  • Winter: Budgerigars that stay in Florida will be less active. They may also form flocks to stay warm.

2. Northern Parula

northern parula
northern parula

Scientific name: Setophaga americana

Size: The Northern Parula is a small bird, measuring about 4.3 to 4.7 inches in length

How to identify: The male Northern Parula is bluish-grey overall with a yellow-green patch on the back and two white wing bars. It has a chestnut band that separates the male’s bright yellow throat and chest. The female Northern Parula is a bit paler and typically lacks the male’s breast band. Both males and females have distinctive white eye crescents.

Habitat: The Northern Parula is found in a variety of habitats, including forests, swamps, and gardens. However, it is most commonly found in deciduous forests and woodlands.

Diet: Northern Parulas are insectivores, and their diet consists of a variety of small insects, including aphids, beetles, flies, and wasps. They will also eat spiders, caterpillars, and other invertebrates.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a Northern Parula in Tampa, Florida is typically 3-5 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a Northern Parula in Tampa, Florida is typically 16-18 centimetres (6.3-7.1 inches).

Calls: The Northern Parula also has a number of other calls, including:

  • A high-pitched “seep” call that is used to communicate with other birds.
  • A sharp “chip” call that is used to alarm other birds of danger.
  • A soft “churr” call that is used to beg for food from parents.

Seasons: 

The Northern Parula is a migratory bird, and it spends the winter in Central and South America. They arrive in Tampa, Florida, in the spring, typically in April. They breed in Tampa from April to August, and then they migrate back to their wintering grounds in the fall.

3. Painted Bunting

painted bunting
painted bunting

Scientific name: Passerina ciris

Size: The Painted Bunting is a small bird, about 5 inches long and weighing about 0.7 ounces. The female Painted Bunting is slightly smaller than the male.

How to identify: The male Painted Bunting is stunningly colored with a blue head, red under parts, and green back. The female is more subdued, with a green back and a blue head.

Habitat: The Painted Bunting’s habitat in Tampa includes shrubby thickets, forest edges, and thorn scrub. They are also known to frequent parks, gardens, and backyards. Painted Buntings prefer habitats with dense vegetation, which provides them with cover from predators and nesting sites. They also need access to open areas for foraging.

Diet: The diet of the Painted Bunting in Tampa, Florida is varied, and they eat a mixture of seeds, insects, and berries.

  • Seeds: Painted Buntings eat a variety of seeds, including millet, niger, and white proso millet. They also eat the seeds of native plants, such as sunflowers, black-eyed Susans, and thistles. 
  • Insects: Painted Buntings eat a variety of insects, including beetles, grasshoppers, caterpillars, and spiders. They also eat the eggs and larvae of insects.
  • Berries: Painted Buntings eat a variety of berries, including mulberries, blueberries, and cherries. They also eat the fruits of native plants, such as pokeweed and elderberries.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a Painted Bunting in Tampa, Florida is typically 3-5 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a Painted Bunting in Tampa, Florida is typically 8.3-9.1 inches.

Calls: The Painted Bunting is a songbird, and it has a variety of calls. The most common call is a short, sharp “tsick.” This call is used to communicate with other Painted Buntings, and it can be used to defend territory, attract mates, or warn of danger.

The Painted Bunting also has a more complex song. The song is a jumbled series of high-pitched notes, and it is often described as sounding like “graffiti graffiti spaghetti-for-two.” The song is used to attract mates, and it is also used to defend territory.

Seasons: The Painted Bunting is a migratory bird, and they can be seen in Tampa, Florida during the winter months. They breed in the south-eastern United States, and they winter in Mexico and Central America.

  • The Painted Bunting typically arrives in Tampa, Florida in October, and they stay until March or April. The peak season for seeing Painted Buntings in Tampa is during the winter months, from December to February.
  • During the breeding season, Painted Buntings are found in shrubby thickets, forest edges, and thorn scrub. In Tampa, Florida, they are most likely to be seen in parks, gardens, and backyards.
  • In the winter, Painted Buntings are found in more open areas, such as fields and meadows. They are also known to frequent feeders that contain millet or nyjer seed.

`4. Nanday Parakeet

nanday parakeet
nanday parakeet

Scientific name: Aratinga nenday.

Size: The size of a Nanday Parakeet in Tampa, Florida is about 11 to 12 inches long and weighs about 5 ounces.

How to identify: There are a few key features that can help you identify a Nanday Parakeet in Tampa, Florida. These features include:

  • Black head and neck. Nanday Parakeets are the only parrots with a black head and neck. This is a distinctive feature that makes them easy to identify.
  • Green body. The rest of the Nanday Parakeet’s body is mostly green. The green feathers on their body are a darker shade of green than the feathers on their head and neck.
  • Yellow belly. The Nanday Parakeet has a yellow belly. This is a small but noticeable feature that can help you identify them.
  • Red patch on forehead. The Nanday Parakeet has a small red patch on its forehead. This is another small but distinctive feature that can help you identify them.
  • Long, tapered tail. The Nanday Parakeet has a long, tapered tail. This is a feature that helps them to fly and balance.

Habitat: Nanday Parakeets are found in a variety of habitats in Tampa, Florida, including:

  • Woodlands: They are often seen in oak and pine woodlands, as well as in areas with palm trees.
  • Urban areas: They have also adapted well to urban areas and can be seen in parks, gardens, and even on rooftops.
  • Coastal areas: They can also be found in coastal areas, where they feed on palm nuts and other fruits. 

Diet: Nanday Parakeets are omnivorous birds and they eat a variety of foods, including:

  • Fruits: Nanday Parakeets love fruit and they will eat a variety of different fruits, including bananas, apples, grapes, and oranges.
  • Seeds: Nanday Parakeets also eat seeds, including sunflower seeds, millet, and peanuts.
  • Nuts: Nanday Parakeets will also eat nuts, including almonds, walnuts, and hazelnuts.
  • Vegetables: Nanday Parakeets will also eat vegetables, including carrots, broccoli, and corn.
  • Insects: Nanday Parakeets will also eat insects, including crickets, mealworms, and grasshoppers.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a Nanday Parakeet in Tampa, Florida is typically 20 to 30 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a Nanday Parakeet in Tampa, Florida is typically 20 to 22 inches.

Calls: Nanday Parakeets are very vocal birds and they make a variety of calls, including:

  • Screeching: Nanday Parakeets are known for their loud screeching calls. These calls are often used to communicate with other Nanday Parakeets, as well as to warn of danger.
  • Chittering: Nanday Parakeets also make a variety of chattering noises. These noises are often used as a form of communication, but they can also be used to express excitement or happiness.
  • Whistling: Nanday Parakeets can also whistle. This is a more mellow sound than their screeching or chattering calls, and it is often used as a form of communication.
  • Kraakking: Nanday Parakeets also make a loud, kraakking sound. This sound is often used as a warning call, or to express aggression.

Seasons: Nanday Parakeets are non-migratory birds, so they can be seen in Tampa, Florida all year round. However, there are some seasonal changes in their behaviour.

  • In the spring, Nanday Parakeets are busy breeding. They will build nests in trees or other cavities, and they will lay 4-6 eggs. The eggs will hatch after about 26 days, and the young birds will fledge after about 6 weeks.
  • In the summer, Nanday Parakeets are molting. They will lose their old feathers and grow new ones. This process can take several months.
  • In the fall, Nanday Parakeets are preparing for winter. They will start to eat more food and store up fat. They will also start to migrate to warmer areas if they live in colder climates.

5. Green Heron

green heron
green heron

Scientific name: Butorides virescens.

Size: The Green Heron is a small heron, with an average body length of 19 inches (48 cm). 

How to identify: The Green Heron is green on the back and wings, with a white belly and a black cap. The juveniles are browner, with pale streaking on the neck and spots on the wings.

Habitat: The Green Heron is a versatile bird and can be found in a variety of habitats, including:

  • Wetlands: Marshes, swamps, ponds, and lakes are all good places to find Green Herons. They are often seen standing motionless at the water’s edge, waiting for prey to swim by.
  • Wooded areas: Green Herons can also be found in wooded areas near water, such as riverbanks and mangrove forests. They will often perch in trees or shrubs, waiting for prey to move by.
  • Backyards: If you have a backyard with a pond or other water source, you might even be lucky enough to attract a Green Heron. They are not as common in backyards as some other birds, but they are not unheard of.

Diet: The Green Heron is an opportunistic feeder and will eat a variety of prey, including:

  • Fish: Fish are the most common prey item for Green Herons. They will often stand motionless at the water’s edge, waiting for fish to swim by. When they see a fish, they will strike quickly with their long bill.
  • Frogs: Frogs are another important prey item for Green Herons. They will often forage in shallow water, looking for frogs that are sitting on the bottom. They will also catch frogs that are swimming by.
  • Insects: Insects are a good source of protein for Green Herons, and they will eat a variety of insects, including dragonflies, grasshoppers, and beetles. They will often catch insects in flight, or they will pick them off of vegetation.
  • Small mammals: Green Herons will occasionally eat small mammals, such as mice and rats. They will often catch these mammals by stalking them along the water’s edge.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a Green Heron in Florida is typically 10-12 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a Green Heron in Florida, Tampa is typically 26 inches.

Calls: The Green Heron has a variety of calls, including:

  • A harsh, explosive skeow call: This is the most common call of the Green Heron, and it is often given when the bird is alarmed or disturbed.
  • A series of raspy clucks: This call is given when the bird is disturbed at the nest.
  • Grating screams: These calls are given during the breeding season.

Seasons: Green Herons are year-round residents of Florida, so you can see them in Tampa any time of the year. However, they are more abundant during the breeding season, which is from March to July.

6. Monk Parakeet:

monk parakeet
monk parakeet

Scientific name: Myiopsitta monachus

Size: The monk parakeet, or green bird in Tampa, Florida, is about 11-13 inches long from head to the tip of the long, tapered tail. 

How to identify: Monk parakeets are typically green, with a grey face and breast. The lores, cheeks, and throat are a pale grey and the feathers on the throat and abdomen are edged in a lighter grey, giving them a scalloped, barred look. The primary and outer secondary flight feathers are blue. The bill of a monk parakeet is pale pink.

Habitat: Monk parakeets are found in a variety of habitats, including:

  • Wooded areas: Monk parakeets prefer to live in areas with trees, where they can build their nests. They are often seen in parks, gardens, and orchards.
  • Urban areas: Monk parakeets have also adapted to living in urban areas, where they can find food and shelter in buildings and other structures. They are often seen in cities, towns, and suburbs.
  • Open areas: Monk parakeets can also be found in open areas, such as fields and meadows. They are attracted to these areas because they provide food and nesting sites.

Diet: Monk parakeets are omnivorous and eat a variety of foods, including:

  • Seeds: Monk parakeets love seeds, and they will eat a variety of different types, including millet, sunflower seeds, and corn.
  • Fruits: Monk parakeets also enjoy fruits, and they will eat a variety of different types, including apples, bananas, and grapes.
  • Insects: Monk parakeets will eat insects, such as grasshoppers, crickets, and beetles.
  • Blossoms: Monk parakeets will eat blossoms, such as those from roses, hibiscus, and dandelions.
  • Vegetables: Monk parakeets will also eat vegetables, such as carrots, broccoli, and peas.
  • Nuts: Monk parakeets will eat nuts, such as peanuts and almonds.

Lifespan: The average lifespan of a monk parakeet in Tampa, Florida is 20-30 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a monk parakeet in Tampa, Florida is typically 48 centimetres (19 inches).

Calls: Here are some of the most common calls of monk parakeets:

  • Squawk: This is the most common call of monk parakeets. It is a loud, harsh sound that is often used to communicate with other monk parakeets.
  • Whistle: This is a high-pitched sound that is often used to attract mates or to warn other monk parakeets of danger.
  • Chirp: This is a soft, high-pitched sound that is often used to communicate with young monk parakeets.
  • Cackle: This is a loud, harsh sound that is often used to defend territory or to scare away predators.

Seasons: Here are some of the things you can expect to see and hear from monk parakeets in Tampa, Florida throughout the year:

  • Spring: In the spring, monk parakeets are busy building nests and raising young. You may hear them calling to each other and squawking as they work on their nests.
  • Summer: In the summer, monk parakeets are molting their feathers. You may see them sitting in trees or on power lines, fluffing up their feathers and preening.
  • Fall: In the fall, monk parakeets are preparing for winter. You may see them gathering food and storing it away for the cold months ahead.
  • Winter: In the winter, monk parakeets are less active. They may gather in flocks to stay warm, and they may be seen eating seeds from bird feeders.

7. Green-winged teal

green winged teal
green winged teal

Scientific name: Anas carolinensis.

Size: The green-winged teal is a small duck, about 12.2-15.3 inches (31-39 cm) long. 

How to identify: The male green-winged teal has a green head and neck, with a white stripe on the breast and a black crescent on the side of the head. The female is brown and buff, with a white belly and a green speculum.

Habitat: Green-winged teals are found in a variety of wetland habitats, including marshes, ponds, and lakes. They are also known to frequent agricultural fields, where they feed on waste grain.

Diet: Green-winged teals are omnivorous, meaning they eat both plants and animals. Their diet consists of a variety of seeds, insects, and small fish.

  • Plants: Green-winged teals eat the seeds of a variety of aquatic plants, including pondweeds, sedges, and smartweeds. They also eat the leaves and stems of some plants, such as cattails and bulrushes.
  • Insects: Green-winged teals eat a variety of insects, including mosquitoes, midges, and caddisflies. They also eat small crustaceans, such as copepods and amphipods.
  • Fish: Green-winged teals will occasionally eat small fish, such as minnows and shad. They are not as adept at catching fish as other ducks, such as mallards and pintails.

Lifespan: The lifespan of a green-winged teal in Florida is typically 10-12 years.

Wingspan: The wingspan of a green-winged teal in Florida is typically 20.5-23.2 inches (52-59 cm).

Calls: The green-winged teal is a small duck that is known for its whistling calls. The male green-winged teal has a clear, whistling call that is often described as “peep-weep”. The female green-winged teal has a more raspy call that is often described as “whee-whee”.

The green-winged teal’s calls are used for a variety of purposes, including:

  • Courtship: The male green-winged teal’s whistling call is used to attract mates.
  • Breeding: The female green-winged teal’s raspy call is used to communicate with her mate and her ducklings.
  • Alarm: The green-winged teal’s calls can also be used to warn other ducks of danger.

Seasons: Here are the seasons of green-winged teals in Florida:

  • Fall: Green-winged teals begin to arrive in Florida in September and October. They are most common during this time, and they can be seen in a variety of wetland habitats.
  • Winter: Green-winged teals remain in Florida throughout the winter. They are still most common during this time, but their numbers begin to decline as they migrate north.
  • Spring: Green-winged teals begin to migrate north in March or April. They are still present in Florida during this time, but their numbers are much lower.
  • Summer: Green-winged teals do not breed in Florida. They migrate to the northern United States and Canada to breed.

Frequently asked question: green birds in Tampa Florida 

Q: What are some of the beautiful green birds found in Tampa, Florida?

A: Tampa is home to a variety of stunning green birds, including the emerald toucanet, green heron, monk parakeet, green kingfisher, painted bunting, green-throated carib, and the green parrotlet.

Q: Where can I spot these green birds in Tampa?

A: You can find these green birds in various locations around Tampa, such as Lettuce Lake Park, Honeymoon Island State Park, and the Circle B Bar Reserve. These parks offer diverse habitats where the birds can be observed.

Q: What is the best time of day to see these green birds?

A: Green birds are most active during the early morning hours and late afternoon. Plan your bird watching trips during these times to increase your chances of spotting them.

Q: Are these green birds’ migratory or year-round residents in Tampa?

A: The presence of green birds in Tampa can vary. Some species, like the painted bunting, are migratory and visit Tampa during specific seasons, while others, like the green heron and monk parakeet, are year-round residents.

Q: How can I identify these green birds?

A: Each green bird species has unique characteristics. It is helpful to carry a field guide or use a bird identification app to assist with identification. Pay attention to their size, shape, plumage patterns, and any distinct features like colored beaks or eye markings.

Q: What behaviours can I expect to observe in these green birds?

A: Green birds engage in a range of fascinating behaviours. For example, the emerald toucanet is known for its acrobatic flight and vibrant beak, while the green kingfisher is often seen hovering over water before diving for fish. Each species has its own unique behaviours worth observing.

Q: Are these green birds endangered or protected?

A: The conservation status of green birds in Tampa varies among species. Some, like the painted bunting, are considered of conservation concern due to habitat loss, while others, like the monk parakeet, are introduced and considered an invasive species. It is important to respect their habitats and adhere to local regulations to ensure their protection.

Q: Can I take photographs of these green birds?

A: Yes, you can capture photographs of these green birds during your bird watching expeditions. Using a camera with a zoom lens will allow you to capture their beauty without getting too close and causing disturbance.

Q: How can I contribute to the conservation of these green birds?

A: You can support the conservation of green birds by practicing responsible bird watching, respecting their habitats, and supporting local conservation organizations. Additionally, learning more about their habitat needs and advocating for their protection can make a positive impact.

Q: Are there any guided bird watching tours available in Tampa?

A: Yes, there are guided bird watching tours available in Tampa. Joining these tours led by experienced birders can enhance your bird watching experience, provide valuable insights, and ensure you visit the best spots for observing green birds.

conclusion

Through patient observation and respectful encounters, we have glimpsed into the lives of these green avian wonders, witnessing their unique behaviours and hearing their melodic calls. Our journeys through Lettuce Lake Park, Honeymoon Island State Park, and the Circle B Bar Reserve have painted vivid memories of encounters with the green heron’s stealthy hunting, the monk parakeet’s communal nests, and the green kingfisher’s breath-taking dives.

So, whether you find yourself strolling along Tampa’s shores, wandering through its parks, or gazing into the canopies of its trees, keep your eyes open and your ears tuned to the melodies of these magnificent green birds. They are an enduring reminder of the boundless wonders that nature bestows upon us, and their presence serves as a testament to the magic that can be found in the heart of Tampa, Florida.

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